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povster

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "cwroyds"
I am not certain that the Shellac from the hardware store is the same as sitar dudes use.
It is probably similar and could be used as replacement, but maybe one of the big knowledge heads here could elaborate.
I am always erring on the side of caution when putting things onto the surfaces of my sitar.
Commercial pre-packaged shellac usually contains additives to lengthen the shelf life. It also tends to be a bit thick to my taste. I preferred mixing my own "back in the day" when I was more active in refinishing my instruments etc.

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povster

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "element-82"
I would have to disagree with everyone so far. I find glue or shellac (easy way out) is a pain because you have to pop it off and re glue everytime you do jawari.
Elemenet - I think of you as a friend but I do not understand this. Why would you want to remove the bridge to do a jawari? With the bridges I have glued on (see my previous post about the fine line of dilute white glue) the bridge will remain on the tabli for the duration of my doing a jawari. I do the filing/sanding/chiseling etc while the beridge is still adhered to the tabli. It makes more sense to me, as you have a common baseline (the fixed position of the bridge) to work from.

I DO like the peg idea. Have seen it, understand it and agree with it but - when it comes to doing jawari, I'd rather have the bridge on the tabli. So I decided to go the glue route. But then again, I love dark chocolate and some prefer milk chocolate. As long as it works for you.

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element-82

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hey Pov,
hope you didn't take offense, just voicing an opinion
That makes more sense, you just do the jawari right on the tabli. From the way you explained it, it seems perfectly logical. I think it will come down to the way you are comfortable doing jawari. I like to take it off and put it in a vice so that I can get the full flow leaning on the file slightly. My concern would be slipping with the file and marking the tabli, or cracking the tomba. Or just not being able to get the file in the desired angel. I guess you just have to be very careful. You have thought it through and have no problems, so it is clearly a style thing.

I am not sure the shellac drop would work that way though. It might just pop off. I assume the intent is to pop\ that thing off to do jawari?

BTW I like dark chocolate too, 77% choc is great

Pb



Quote:
Originally Posted by "povster"
Elemenet - I think of you as a friend but I do not understand this. Why would you want to remove the bridge to do a jawari? With the bridges I have glued on (see my previous post about the fine line of dilute white glue) the bridge will remain on the tabli for the duration of my doing a jawari. I do the filing/sanding/chiseling etc while the beridge is still adhered to the tabli. It makes more sense to me, as you have a common baseline (the fixed position of the bridge) to work from.

I DO like the peg idea. Have seen it, understand it and agree with it but - when it comes to doing jawari, I'd rather have the bridge on the tabli. So I decided to go the glue route. But then again, I love dark chocolate and some prefer milk chocolate. As long as it works for you.

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povster

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "element-82"
Hey Pov,
hope you didn't take offense, just voicing an opinion
That makes more sense, you just do the jawari right on the tabli. From the way you explained it, it seems perfectly logical. I think it will come down to the way you are comfortable doing jawari. I like to take it off and put it in a vice so that I can get the full flow leaning on the file slightly. My concern would be slipping with the file and marking the tabli, or cracking the tomba. Or just not being able to get the file in the desired angel. I guess you just have to be very careful. You have thought it through and have no problems, so it is clearly a style thing.

I am not sure the shellac drop would work that way though. It might just pop off. I assume the intent is to pop\ that thing off to do jawari?

BTW I like dark chocolate too, 77% choc is great

Pb
Diety, no! I took no offense. I was honestly wondering your take on removing the bridge to do jawari.

I don't tend to use a lot of pressure. I prefer lighter strokes - often just 2 or 3 and then slip at least the baj back on to get a feel. If it is feeling right I slip on the others and can fine tune with a small, sharp chisel. Then again, I also tend to do jawari long before the groove sets in, so less machination is needed. But it is definitely a style thang! What works best for you.

I agree about 77% - I have had up to 100% (which, under the right circumstances, is shockingly good but often just a bit too much). But rigt around 77% is a nice balance. Ultimately I found the really high percentages work VERY well for hot chocloate. I just fine slice 2 or 3 segments, depending on their size, and add them to milk that has just boiled and had the heat cut off. Whisk it in with 2 tablespoons of raw sugar and a couple of drops of vanilla. Man that's tasty!

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Dasani - the official bottled water of ICM
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martin spaink

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Reply with quote  #20 
Hi all, about whether to glue bridges on or not: there is an other option that I have seen on both sitars and tanpura's, which is hidden pin-holing under the feet of the bridge. Works beautiful in every way if done accurately. I've seen sitars with all kinds of pins inserted against the lower foot but that impresses me as a lazyman's job.
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sitardoc

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Reply with quote  #21 
personally, i've never glued a bridge to the tabli. a really good fit assures that the bridge will stay in place. my RR has two bone pins but due to the fit, i'd bet that i could remove them without a problem and the bridge would stay in place. on my POS RKS, there are no pins at all. you can lay it on the floor and lift it by the bridge and nothing moves.
if you're absolutely itching for something to adhere the bridge to the tabli, i'd start with 3M double sided tape. it's the same stuff they sell in their window-sealing kits. it's easy to use, easy to remove, and will not mar the tabli in any way.
-the doc :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
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