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maurice

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Any fans of George Harrison here?
As a Beatle,he/they released only three "Indian" songs,Love you To,Within You Without You and The Inner Light.
When The Beatles stopped touring in August 1966,George went to India to meet Ravi Shankar and a very close friendship began.

Possible highlight was The Concert for Bangladesh in 1971.
George went on to record some wonderful albums particuarly All Things Must Pass.

A wonderful musician and equally,human being.

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nicneufeld

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One of my questions about him is how he seemed to either relinquish Indian classical, or restrict himself from performing it. One didn't see a lot of traditional Indian music performed by him, nor did he seem to at least openly continue the sitar later in his life, that I know of at least. I can of course understand...if one is one of the greatest songwriters and guitarists in the world, starting off again as a beginner in a completely different context would be difficult. But I wonder if there is some to the story I don't know, would be keen for any more detailed information. Are there any recordings of him, for example, performing a raag, outside of the few videos of him in the 60s taking lessons from Ravi Shankar? It is ironic, a little bit, that the man to whom so many of us in the West (yes, including me) owe their introduction to Indian music seemed to not delve so deep into it. But a lovely musician anyway...I love his "Give me Love, Give me peace on earth" and I'm not even a hippie!
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maurice

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Reply with quote  #3 
George actually said that he could practise the sitar for x amount of years and still not be even half as good as many in India.Thus,I suppose he went back to "rock" and left the Indian influenced Beatles numbers behind him.

Give me love is a wonderful song.

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Bhuvanesh

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "nicneufeld"
One of my questions about him is how he seemed to either relinquish Indian classical, or restrict himself from performing it. One didn't see a lot of traditional Indian music performed by him, nor did he seem to at least openly continue the sitar later in his life, that I know of at least. I can of course understand...if one is one of the greatest songwriters and guitarists in the world, starting off again as a beginner in a completely different context would be difficult. But I wonder if there is some to the story I don't know, would be keen for any more detailed information. Are there any recordings of him, for example, performing a raag, outside of the few videos of him in the 60s taking lessons from Ravi Shankar? It is ironic, a little bit, that the man to whom so many of us in the West (yes, including me) owe their introduction to Indian music seemed to not delve so deep into it. But a lovely musician anyway...I love his "Give me Love, Give me peace on earth" and I'm not even a hippie!
Perhaps it was becoming a distraction for George and he wanted to focus on rock/pop. Also, if someone is good at one genre of music, that doesn't necessarily mean (s)he will be good at another genre. If I thought I would not be particularly good at performing Indian music, I would rather give it up.
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trippy monkey

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B


I wish someone would tell all these bloody guitarists I meet in Varanasi this!!!!

Nearly every 'tourist' expressing a wish to learn some sitar says ' I play guitar' as if this opens some magic door we NON-guitarists have missed.

Nick
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chrisitar

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Reply with quote  #6 
possible stupid question: Was George the first 'white guy' to play sitar? I'm sure there would have been someone else throughout the colonial/independence period but I've never heard of anyone.
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trippy monkey

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There was most certainly our own Brit born Clem Alford who was in India & learning sitar around the same time as George.

Can we say George was really any good on sitar anyway???

Nick
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #8 
Amusingly I listened to Sgt Pepper for the first time in, well, a long while...probably the first time since I've been studying sitar. Listening to Within You Without You, there is the final section that has sitar featured, I believe to be George Harrison if I've read correctly, and not one of the other uncredited Indian musicians. There is this meend to Ga that comes up flat and makes me cringe! I would say he was probably pretty damn good for the time on sitar, and he had a great teacher, but his gifts lay mostly elsewhere (the song itself is fairly masterfully laid out and composed). There was also Brian Jones of the Stones, but I wouldn't be surprised if his was a "me too"ism of Stones/Beatles rivalry.
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #9 
Amusingly I listened to Sgt Pepper for the first time in, well, a long while...probably the first time since I've been studying sitar. Listening to Within You Without You, there is the final section that has sitar featured, I believe to be George Harrison if I've read correctly, and not one of the other uncredited Indian musicians. There is this meend to Ga that comes up flat and makes me cringe! I would say he was probably pretty damn good for the time on sitar, and he had a great teacher, but his gifts lay mostly elsewhere (the song itself is fairly masterfully laid out and composed). There was also Brian Jones of the Stones, but I wouldn't be surprised if his was a "me too"ism of Stones/Beatles rivalry.
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