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plectum

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Reply with quote  #1 
The other day I was reading Sandeep Bagchee's Shruti and came across something interesting. He wrote that Shjahanpur gharana players mostly use gats developed for rabab (and hence in his opinion is truer to sarod baaj), whereas other sarod gharanas generally use rudravina compositions or compositions developed for sitars. So what are the differences between rabab gats and gats from other sources?
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badalandabad

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Reply with quote  #2 
Bagchi's take on this is an oversimplification. Shahjahanpur gharana in the original classification is the gharana of Safayet Ali & son Sahkawat Hussain Khan. Unrelated to what came to be known as the Shahjahanpur gharana later on, which is the lineage of Murad Ali Khan, represented at its peak by Radhika Babu.

Gats performed by both 'Shahjahanpur' gharanas have a common trait. Sthais last 2 to 4 avartans, usually of teental, there is a middle line which takes off into a totally different area of the raga, as if to provide a counterpoint to the view expressed in the sthai, and this usually resolves into the last line of the sthai. Antaras, if they exist, are geometrically congruent to the sthayi and also usually resolve into its last line.

Can't think of too many sarod gharanas that have evolved their gat forms out of dhrupad. Melodies might have been extracted from the core of a dhrupad song or another, but both the 'Shahjahanpur' schools, Lucknow and Maihar, basically stuck to the existing range of patterns, i.e., Masit Khani, Raza Khani, and 'Firoz Khani', the latter being what the gat described in the above paragraph is referred to. Gwalior's traditional gat repertoire is the same as Murad Ali's Shahjahanpur, although both Hafiz Ali and son Amjad Ali have composed eclectic gats.

There is also a kind of slow tintal gat that was common at the turn of the 20th century, which used the following bol pattern, starting from the sam: diri da diri da ra da da ra, diri da diri da ra da da ra, diri da diri da ra da diri da ra, da diri da ra da da ra. Length = 2 cycles. Pace = 1.5 times that of Masit Khani. Divisions: 5-3, 5-3, 5-4, 4-3 (total 32). This was called a Ta-Dhuni gat. This kind of stuff is virtually extinct today.

-Taj
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aparajit

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Reply with quote  #3 
The rabab having smaller sustain (catgut strings) automatically promoted a staccato idiom consisting of powerful right hand strokes and patterns. The gats you refer to have considerable right hand work with "bols". This is why you read the opinion you did. It is accurate. Of course that is not to say that other instruments do not or cannot incorporate bol patterns. If you need more information, continue this thread and I will see if I can elaborate further.
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aparajit

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Reply with quote  #4 
@Taj....did not see your post since I had the page open for 12 hrs. before replying...

What Taj says is accurate.

I am a student of Pt. Dasgupta and we never play the Ra stroke by itself unless it is part of Da- RaDa -Ra Da-. The dashes should be pronounced as aa...or a pause...so in other words if DaAa DaAa DaAa DaAa is 4 beats of all down strokes then DaAa RaDa AaRa DaAa is acceptable but DaAa DaAa RaAA DaAa is not.

Also, I have heard Guruji play a gat in Bilaval (or was it Kukuv Bilaval) which had the following pattern

Diri Da Diri Da Da Da(Sum) Da Da, Diri Da Diri Da Da Da Da Da Aa, Da Diri Da Da, Da Diri Da Da, Da Diri Da Da Da Da Da, Diri Da Diri Da Da Da(Sum)....
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plectum

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thanx to both of you.

Well baghchee also writes that most shajahanpur gats are set to madhya laya. Is this correct?

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You know, music, art - these are not just little decorations to make life prettier. They're very deep necessities which people cannot live without. ~~ Pablo Picasso
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