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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #1 
Greetings, forumites.
Just got back from Miraj yesterday. Here's a slick trick I observed for getting burrs out of frets. These burrs, by the way, are usually the result of the fret being clamped down in a standard bench vise with serrated teeth and pounded with a standard metal hammer to attain the desired bend. "We don't do that anymore, I said in no uncertain terms"! Anyway, with the fret in question already tied to the neck, Take the back side of a hacksaw blade (the edge without the teeth) and drag that straight edge along the fret surface where the burr is, like a cars windshield wiper blade. Three or four passes in both directions and the burr will be gone. If you've got a major glitch on the fret, you may have to hit the area with a spark plug file first. I saw this process done and the result is outstanding. Even the shine remains! Just thought I'd pass this along. Cheers!

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Monica

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hey Tony, that is exactly the problem I thought I had over the past week or so! My main string kept catching on the fret every time I meened R up to M. I polished the fret furiously with fine sandpaper and steel wool to no avail. Every meend from R would still give me a horrible grinding sound and catch jerkily on the fret.

Anyhow, I finally figured out that I just needed to change my string. Ooops! Those nasty edges that wear into the string where it runs over the fret were to blame. (I always thought the string would break before it was jagged enough to stop you from meending properly).

So remember folks, check your strings before you give your frets the overhaul!

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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #3 
Is it at all possible to run a piece of fine sandpaper very quickly/carefully down the string or would this create more problems than it would solve i.e. thinning the string?

Nick
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Joshua Feinberg

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Reply with quote  #4 
i find that 0000 steal wool works great for that. its perfect for removing rust from strings (thats what usually causes the grabbing), and also for polishing frets.

jf

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Monica

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Reply with quote  #5 
I had actually tried the steel wool on the string before I changed it out, but this string was just in real bad shape--far beyond the efforts of a little polish here and there. I wonder though, this was a silver-plated 12 gauge string. Perhaps the wearing through of the silver plating makes for a more jagged edge?
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Joshua Feinberg

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Reply with quote  #6 
silver plated?! i never heard of that. every sitarist i've ever heard of uses stainless steel. Rossau has the best wire for steel.

jf

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Monica

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Reply with quote  #7 
All the Pyramid-brand steel sitar strings are silver-plated. I believe it is supposed to stop them from rusting. (Bharat would know for sure).

Anyhow, I just had that one silver-plated sample and I'm back to the regular Roeslau unplated steel now--I'll see how it ages in comparison.

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Drew

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Reply with quote  #8 
ya, all the sanding, steel wool'ing sometimes doesnt work and can make it worse or is just a bandaid solution that only lasts a 1/2 hour. It can also shorten the life and hurt the sound of the string if you rub too much or hard with the steel wool etc.
once the coating of the string is broken, removed, rusted through or whatever else you will get the crunch. A new string is the fix.

I went through this exact same thing thinking it was my frets. 100 steel wool, metal sand paper strokes later... I finally realized it was just that the string lost its coating in spots and became raw metal and since the metal of the string is harder than the fret it gives it that "crunchy" crunch. Its probably really bad for your frets as well to leave on the old string or try to fix it with steel wool as Im sure it can scratch and dig out chunks of the fret if you arent careful.

I just ordered another large coil from Lutz at fortepiano cause my old coil seems to have become tarnished/oxodized to the point of instant crunchy fret syndrome. Its sucks too because its just a few spots that have the rust cancer and the rest of the string is still silvery smooth. A half a large coil gone to waste because of a few rusty spots

Speaking of which... does anyone have any good tips for storing their strings so they dont oxodize? I had mine wrapped up nicely, in a little box and seemed to work for a long while but, eventually they become oxodized. I know youre to keep them humidity/air free but thats hard unless you have an airtight jar or something. ok, I think I just answered my own question. look for an airtight jar to keep strings in and store in a somewhat cool place. right? wrong? any other ideas?

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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #9 
You might pour in some of those silica gel packs into that container. How effective they are I'm not sure. I've also seen the paper wrapping of string packs oiled up as well. Wether that process would actually trap moisture or not - ??? Anyway, new strings is always a good thing.
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David Russell Watson

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Drew"

Speaking of which... does anyone have any good tips for storing
their strings so they dont oxodize? I had mine wrapped up nicely,
in a little box and seemed to work for a long while but, eventually
they become oxodized. I know youre to keep them humidity/air
free but thats hard unless you have an airtight jar or something.
ok, I think I just answered my own question. look for an airtight
jar to keep strings in and store in a somewhat cool place. right?
wrong? any other ideas?
I only buy a little bit of string at a time, and live in southern
Nevada, so I've never had any problem with corrosion, and
so I've never tried this, but if you're really having a problem
keeping your strings from rusting, I imagine that they could
be stored submerged in oil.

You would probably want to avoid unprocessed oils, such as
are some forms of olive or coconut oil, because those could
contain a small amount of water. I wonder if ghee wouldn't
be the very best thing, heated to melt it when the wire goes
in, then allowed to solidify for storage.

Sounds messy though, I know.

David
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sitarman

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Reply with quote  #11 
Man! That sounds like a lot of work / mess / etc. for keeping strings fresh. A ziplock baggie with silica gel (which comes in a zillion things shipped from overseas) will do the trick. Nothing lasts forever though. That's the problem with buying large rolls of wire if you are not restringing lots of instruments. Nevertheless, the wire still is cheaper inthe long run if purchased on rolls. I will say that the Pyramid strings have been very nice- soundwise and longevity, since Bharat turned me on to them but if I was restringing often, even the baj only, it would be pricey.
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Drew

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "sitarman"
Man! That sounds like a lot of work / mess / etc. for keeping strings fresh. A ziplock baggie with silica gel (which comes in a zillion things shipped from overseas) will do the trick. Nothing lasts forever though. That's the problem with buying large rolls of wire if you are not restringing lots of instruments. Nevertheless, the wire still is cheaper inthe long run if purchased on rolls. I will say that the Pyramid strings have been very nice- soundwise and longevity, since Bharat turned me on to them but if I was restringing often, even the baj only, it would be pricey.

Ya, maybe I will go for the zip lock bag in an air tight jar with some gel packs!

The gel sounds good but it may be too much work for a $10 coil of strings.

I wonder what would happen if you kept the strings in the freezer? Do you think they would become brittle and snap?

Ive never tried the Pyramid strings because of their price. From what Ive heard, they are the best around. However, the thing that turns me off is that sometimes (if you arent careful) you can put a kink or bend in the string by mistake while re-stringing. This freaks me out because if that happens and it was just the main string or any one of the others that got damaged.... it would cost big bucks to replace that one string as you have to buy a new pack. So, that is why I have just stuck with the Ros. wire from fortepiano.

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festus

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Reply with quote  #13 
I've used gun oil for years to keep my strings clean. Lonny Mac told me that SRV did the same but that he used gun oil with Teflon. Intonation last longer......... Oh and I wouldn't ever put strings in a freezer- the condensation/water is not a friend here. :wink:
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Drew

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "festus"
I've used gun oil for years to keep my strings clean. Lonny Mac told me that SRV did the same but that he used gun oil with Teflon. Intonation last longer......... Oh and I wouldn't ever put strings in a freezer- the condensation/water is not a friend here. :wink:

Festus,

how do you apply the gun oil?

do you keep the strings submereged in a jar? or do you just coat them and keep them in a ziplock bag?


and ya, I didnt think the freezer idea would work. Heck, it can barely keep food fresh! :wink:

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festus

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Reply with quote  #15 
Drew,
This isn't for coil string product but for after you've already strung your instrument. I had a used up canister of Fast Fret that I resaturate the dauber with the gun oil. Applying to the strings and then wiping off the excess with a cloth. Make sure to clean underneath the string as that's where all the cheese is.
Gun oil w/ Teflon is toxic stuff - stay smart. For coil string I would just keep them dry , maybe use a spray oil WD 40 or more probably just use a spray vegetable oil. :wink:
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