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pbercker

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Reply with quote  #1 
I was bored and looking around Patrick Moutal's ICM site, I ran across some old photos of musicians, including these 4 tabla players.

A) Can you name all four?

http://imageshack.us/a/img818/2239/fourtablaplayers.jpg

3 are quite familiar but one I had never heard of before.

B) Bonus points: name the gharana they belong to.

C) Extra Bonus point: write down a composition that is typically associated with each tabla player and their gharana, noting all the appropriate nikas and the proper Bayan inflections .... and it goes without saying that this should be in Devnagri notation for the full extra bonus points. ....



Pascal

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My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.
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pbercker

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Reply with quote  #2 
I'm surprised no one hazarded a guess .... but I shouldn't be .... I didn't recognize any of them when I first saw the photographs.


Anyway, top left is Ustad Inam Ali Khan, Delhi Gharana.
Quote:
The son of Ustad Game Khan, khalifa of Delhi Gharana after Game Khansaheb’s death, Ustad Inam Ali Khan was a brilliant tabla player and famed exponent of Delhi Gharana.
Top right is Ustad Abid Hussain Khan, and he turns out to be, according to Pt. Swapan Chaudhuri, "the great maestro Khan Sahib, Khalifa Ustad Abid Hussain Khan Sahib of the Lucknow gharana" (Pt. Swapan Chaudhuri talks about him with great reverence in his interview here ... http://www.tablapassion.com/interview.html).

Bottom right is ... the very young Pt. Anindo Chatterjee, Farukhabad Gharana, and bottom right is the very young Pt. Kishan Maharaj of the Benares gharana.

post-script: I did just now find this bit of info ...
Quote:
Picture from the book The Musicians of India, published in 1929.

The khalifa of Lucknow Gharana, Ustad Abid Hussain Khan was the first professor of tabla at the Bhatkandhe Music College in Lucknow. He began learning tabla under his father, after whose untimely death, he learned from his brother Munne Khan. When his brother also passed away at an early age, he found a vigour and passion for preserving his family’s tradition of tabla and disappeared from the world into his practice for numerous years before emerging as one of the most prominent tabla players of his time.http://tablapictures.wordpress.com/category/maestros-of-tabla/
The picture was missing on the website, but assuming it was the same, this establishes a date for it, assuming the information is correct.

... and that is an assumption that is not always safe to make. For example, this website also says the following:
Quote:
This is a picture of one of greatest tabla players of the 20th century, “Allahwale” Ustad Latif Ahmed Khan. He was the last doyen or khalifa of the Delhi Gharana. He was called Allahwale (loosely translated as the one who Allah is with) because of his incredible tabla virtuosity. It is said that his one “dha” would make you forget all other tabla, that was the purity of his tone.


But this can't be correct I think because Ustad Latif Ahmed Khan (1942-1989) died a year before Ustad Inam Ali Khan (1924-90), who was his teacher, and who was the Khalifa of the Delhi Gharana after his father died, Ustad Game Khan.


Perhaps someone more knowledgeable can clear this up.


.... and since I seem to be pursuing various historical threads, here's another one that seems useful ....
Quote:
Evolution
The earliest gharana to found conventions for creativeness is also the most ancient of the tabla gharanas – the Delhi gharana. It was created by several families near the Delhi-Lucknow-Barreily strip. The other tabla gharanas comprise Ajrada, Benaras, Farrukhabad, Lucknow, and Punjab.Created around the early eighteenth century by Siddhar Khan, the performing style (baj) of this gharana is also called the bandh baj. During the 20th century, the most critical tabla player of the Delhi gharana was Gamay Khan (1883-1958). His son Inam Ali Khan (1924-90) was an influential tabla player of the later portion of the 20th century. His son, Ghulam Haider Khan is presently the ambassador of the gharana. Natthu Khan (1875-1940) is from another stream of the gharana and was one of the foremost tabla players of his time. He was also the father-in-law of Gamay Khan. Latif Ahmed Khan (1941-90) one of the most legendary tabla players of 20th century was a follower of both Gamay Khan and Inam Ali Khan. Shafaat Ahmed Khan the popular tabla accompanist of Ustad Amjad Ali Khan was the son and follower of Chamma Khan from another stream of the gharana. Pandit Chatur Lal was the follower of Haji Mohammad Khan. From the most outstanding initial advocates was Chhote Kale Khan who trained Gamay Khan, the leader of Ustad Inam Ali Khan, a predecessor of the legendary Ustad Latif Ahmed Khan who passed away in the early 1980s. A concurrent line is that of Chamma Khan and his popular son Shafaat Ahmed Khan (illustrious accompanist of sarodiya Amjad Ali Khan). Pandit Chatur Lal trained under Haji Mohammad Khan and Hafiz Miyan of Udaipur and soon after received ‘further tuition’ from Pandit Ravi Shankar. His baaj is taught by his nephew Shiv Narayan.        


(they seem to have an incorrect date for Ustad Latif Ahmed Khan, since he died in 1989, not 1990).

This comes from a source I've not seen before ... "Musicopedia", a subset of "planetradiocity.com".


http://www.planetradiocity.com/musicopedia/article-history/Tabla---Delhi-Gharana/2353

Pascal

__________________
My opinion given without any warranties, expressed or implied, that it's even relevant. It would be folly to rely on my opinion without seeking more professional tabla advice. If you are suffering from a tabla condition, seek immediate attention.
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