INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

Sign up Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 3 of 3      Prev   1   2   3
Kirya

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 740
Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Thick-tabli teak sitars (Hiren Roy) have a focused sound with detailed separation between frequencies and high sustain and dynamic range. Thin-tabli mahogany sitars (Miraj) are louder, but have a muddier sound that's difficult to control and can sound harsh at high volumes.
I think playing the sitars I have side by side really makes this clear. While this new one is clearly the loudest it does not have the harmonics and overall aural integrity & quality of the two thicker tabli sitars I have. But I must say it is nice to have a high volume instrument that may be better in group play context (e.g kirtan) but I think it is less satisfying when playing alone.

But the other two have had jawari done by Scott Hackleman so they are also probably better optimized, as this one has only gotten basic Kirya jawari thus far.

__________________
Kirya
Los Angeles, CA
0
hackleman

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #32 
Hi Kirya - I'm kind of late checking the forum, but figured I'd weigh-in on peg dynamics and see if it helps.
Contrary to what one might think, roughing-up the surfaces (of the peg and/or the hole) is NOT a proper solution to peg slippage (a temporary remedy, but not a solution) and although it may remedy slippage for awhile, it more-times-than-not does not provide for an even action. In fact, it is part of the reason so many sitar pegs slip so badly in the first place. They try to compensate for a poorly fit peg by adding friction to it via a rough or abrasive surface. Once the roughness wears-down (which will happen sooner and sooner), you are left with an even WORSE fitting peg (often protruding out the other side) and an 'egg-shaped' hole.
It's best to think of a peg the same way you think of a wedge. A wedge, even a smooth wedge, will jamb tightly when even gently inserted into a matching slot. The proverbial round peg in a round hole does not. A tuning peg is a "round wedge". If the taper of the peg matches the taper of the hole you have a tight and EVEN fit. A properly fit tapered peg usually needs lubrication rather than added friction believe it or not! ('Peg dope' used in orchestral instruments actually has a little wax in it)
I know this may not help much as far as what you have the tools to do, but I think you can use the theory behind it to avoid making a bad situation worse. I recommend you don't go over-board with the roughing-up.
You are best to try to get a good match of the peg/hole taper and even the surface with no more than 100grit.
Here is a low-tech way to dress the pegs. Not perfect, but better than crude:
-1 Lightly sand the peg by wrapping the sandpaper around it (rough side in) and turning the peg inside the wrap. This makes for and even taper.
-2 Make a "poor-mans-reamer"...wrap 100x sandpaper (once around) the peg (rough side out) and use the peg itself as a "reamer" to match the hole to it better.
-3 Twist the freshly-sanded peg in the freshly-sanded hole and note any smooth spots on the peg or in the hole...these are high-points you don't want. Repeat the process until the 'smooth spots' are no longer 'spots', but indicate an even contact.
-4 When you have a really good fit, conventional chalk-board chalk is adequate...it provides both friction and lubrication.
-5 Clean the chalk off occasionally with 100x so it doesn't get thick.

Sorry I'm not in SoCal to do the work for you...I'll be coming down in September to work on the UCLA collection.

All the best,
-Scott
0
rex@sitar.co.za

Registered:
Posts: 674
Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "hackleman"
All the best,
-Scott
Thanks so much for your post, Scott, we really appreciate your contribution!!
0
Kirya

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 740
Reply with quote  #34 
Thank you Scott for this advice --

My touch is very light and I would only correct the most obvious problems and rather have you finish it off properly than mess with it too much, especially since I got it cheap and I think it has promise after a real luthier gives it a once over.

Also I want to optimize it for tuning in C since that is what sarod players prefer and also makes it easier to jam with western music instruments. This may mean that I will have to change teh guage of some key strings.

I just wanted to get to a point that I can play it now without constant slippage, and I have gotten there, even though I am still far from the perfectly balanced situation you left my Naskar in.

__________________
Kirya
Los Angeles, CA
0
hackleman

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #35 
Will do, Kirya. Sounds like a good idea.
Quote:
Originally Posted by "rex@sitar.co.za"
Thanks so much for your post, Scott, we really appreciate your contribution!!
You're welcome, rex...I was afraid it was a bit long-winded, but those that know me would expect that anyway :-)
0
mizrable

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 99
Reply with quote  #36 
Just to clarify AB Rosin is bow rosin not peg dope
and its really works nicely without harming your peg surface especially on those extra stubborn oily teak pegs!
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.