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bayou23

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Reply with quote  #1 
Found an unexpected gem for cheap (1960's sitar for $100) of course the downfall is the thing needs strings(no big deal) but also has two broken pegs. How much would it cost to get that fix, and is it an easy fix that I could possibly do myself?


thanks everybody
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TCPerez

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Reply with quote  #2 
I don't think theres any practical way to repair snapped pegs, but you can order new ones from the major dealers like AACM or Rain City Music. $100 is a steal for any sitar!
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povster

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Reply with quote  #3 
Often when ordering replacement new pegs the pges have a fair amount of extra stock on the shaft, so be prepared for some work filing, sanding and a little sawing for length to get the right fit.

On possibility would be to try some existing pegs in the holes where the broken ones are. See if you can send samples of ones that fit right and have them approximate the dimensions, erring a little on being too wide. This would greatly reduce the amount of hand work you would need to do to get a final fit.

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yak.a.co

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi bayou
Depends on what pegs you mean, main or taraf? However both can be repaired the same way main ones being bigger are easier task to work with. Chceck this -> http://www.sitarfactory.be/repairs/kuti-repair/
The only way in which I make it better is I cut the shaft a little more away from the ball, this way I can preserve the collar below the handle and the peg stays identical with others even after repair. The only disadvantage is you have to make the joint deeper inside, which is a little hardwork, ha
Jan
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #5 
Pictures on here always help, too! For instance if you are new to sitar you might not know which missing/broken pegs are for main strings and which are for sympathetics. The sympathetics have smaller pegs than the main strings. But aacm.org or raincitymusic.com should have what you would need. Well....patience sold seperately!
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OM GUY

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "bayou23"
Found an unexpected gem for cheap (1960's sitar for $100) of course the downfall is the thing needs strings(no big deal) but also has two broken pegs. How much would it cost to get that fix, and is it an easy fix that I could possibly do myself?


thanks everybody


You also didn't mention exactly where the "break" is. Is the shaft still in the instrument and in need of extraction, etc?

It has been my limited observation, and feel free to correct me, that hole placement on the shaft is also fairly critical. In my taraf peg replacement sojourn, it appears that when the sitar is made, each peg is crafted to fit their particular hole placement, either generally speaking or precisely speaking.

I say "generally or precisely" because it's been my experience that on both old and new sitars, upon extracting the pegs, the "factory slash markings" that are used to identify the pegs that correspond to their respective hole positions on the instrument, are not always true. (This is why I always...always...re-mark them myself). I have also noticed, (a few times anyway), one drilled through hole and one attempted start of another hole.

This is all boiling down to: how does the hole in the peg shaft correspond with the actual eyelet position on the dand, in the case of taraf pegs? And, does it matter? How much (extra) pressure is being forced upon a peg where the string is at a 45' angle to the eylet, as opposed to the hole being very near the eyelet?

I realize I may be answering a question with a question, but feel it's worth exploring, something to think about, at least.

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coyootie

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Reply with quote  #7 
if you want to use the original pegs:
what I've done more times than I want to recall, is-
saw a v-shaped slot into the shank by the peghead side. about 1/2 " long should do. make it as far down the shank as possible. then cut a corresponding spear shape wedge to fit tightly in the v. from a matching or similar wooden rough shank. then shape it to a taper and fine tune it for fit. if you haven't done peg fitting you will wish you had taken it to a luthier to do it.but if you are dextrous and patient you can do this yourself.
i use fast set epoxy and if the joint is visible you can rub some of the sawdust from your cutoffs into it before it dries. if the replaced shank is the same or similar wood it can be all but invisible. if the joint is inside the neck, no worry.
if you can find a match for the peg, way easier to do that!
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