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dennis

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Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #1 
So I'm playing along to some Tabla loops And all of a sudden- I hear a snap. Next thing I know, all my taraf strings are loose and scattered all over and I'm out of tune badely. Turns out that the little bone peice that holds all those on at the bottom of the sitar snapped. My Sitar is fairly new but I'm hoping someone has a way to fix this. I took the tail piece off and looked at it. I have no idea what it is called but I'm a bit afraid to try fixing it without some advice . I cant posably be the first person this has happened to.

Help Please
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neela sangeeta

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Reply with quote  #2 
It happens! you need to get a new bone peice. Some other people on the forum would have better advice on how to re fix it, but it is basically a friction fit I beleive.

Neel
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dennis

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Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks. I've checked around and nobody advertises those. I'll have to call or make something else, perhasps stronger. I think it broke due to the tail piece cut into it and needs filing.
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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #4 
Welcome to Indian quality control standards! If there is still a piece of the original post sitting flush or as a stump in the tail piece, you will either have to pull it out (if grippable) or else drill that dog out. Once you've got an obvious hole for a replacement post, make said post from either a hunk of bone or like the Rikhi Ram shop, use a piece of aluminum. A hardware or hobby shop should have some kind of stock that will work. It will need to be about 2" + - long with a slight taper so it can wedge fit in with enough sticking out for the strings to wrap around.
Hey! Better yet! If you've got the time, order the replacement piece off eBay ("sitar") or from one of the dealers here. See the column of adverts on the left of your screen! Tough break with that post. On ordering, specify "NO MARROW" !!! Cheers!

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Stephen

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Posts: 39
Reply with quote  #5 
I had this happen on my first surbahar which affixed the tarabs at the langot (on my current instrument they are mounted to a bone piece with three large pins just inside of the sound hole). I replaced the broken bone peg with a tapered stainless steel pin from the hardware shop...perfect fit, $2.
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sitarman

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Posts: 599
Reply with quote  #6 
Wow Dennis! That sucks! I haven't heard of that happening before, although the other responders seemed to acknowledge it isn't the first time they've heard of it. Maybe the seller of your sitar could rush you out a replacement? The only minor catastrophe I ever had was a broken peg on a student grade sitar years back.At least, when yiou do get it replaced, you won't have to restring the tarbs from the peg end- that is a long job!
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dennis

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Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks for the replys. The hardware Store seems to be where I'm headed to see about getting something that will work. I guess it sort of just sits in there. I hope the Ghord is thick enough to hold the presure of all those strings.

I've had this Sitar for about a month. Its broken a Tuning Peg ( will cost 15.00 for the Peg + 35.00 if I want it fitted. ) The paint is already peeling off the Top Tomba, which didn't arrive for over a week after the Sitar was shipped. Its a Sristi half decoration. I've taken perfect care of it. Is this typical for a 600 dollar Sitar or did I get a lemon?
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trippy monkey

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Posts: 4,281
Reply with quote  #8 
Dennis
There's a very sweet smell of 'Kitchen Fresh' from your posts. Lemon doesn't cover the half of it. Was the $600 complete with postage? Was nearly all of this actually postage because it sounds like a real crappy you have, I'm afraid?
Gulab/rose pegs are only 50 roops here.

My 2nd sitar in the early 80s went like this with the outer gourd paint flaking off.

It often makes me wonder how these things hold on at all when you carefully look at them. They're not really attached to the gourd, I can't see that fragile thing holding that pressure, but to wood just inside the gourd/tabli join, I think. It's ingenious.

As with Stephen's both my surbahars' taraf are attached in the 'middle' & it looks quite nice like that.
Is there any 'sound' concensus on this? I.E. resonance difference? Tony??

While I'm in Varanasi I'll get a nice bag of all these kind of extras. Just in case. :wink:

Nick
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sitarman

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Posts: 599
Reply with quote  #9 
Dennis, you may have told me where the sitar came from, and don't post it here as we don't want to blame anyone prematurely. It sounds like it just isn't very well made, at least the trimmings. $600 isn't a lot for a sitar but it shouldn't fall apart. You have every right to demand reparations from a dealer. They are very concerned with word of mouth and would probably do whatever they can to get you going, I would think.
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Anonymous

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Posts: 987
Reply with quote  #10 
This is Bharat from Sitars Etc. Dennis bought this sitar from us. We had the sitar in stock and was played and tuned and it was a beautiful sounding and looking sitar. Dennis is reporting a extrordinary amount of string breakage and now a peg and the anchor for the tarafi. Our tech and now I believe that Dennis may be tuning the sitar too high and this may be causing part of the problem. In any case whether that is true or not, we've asked Dennis to return the upper gourd that is showing the problem so we can repair or replace it at our cost. The problem with the Peg and the anchor needs to be examined but we have offered to help to correct the problem anyway.

I have told Dennis that the upper gourd was in stock for some time and did not show any signs of a paint problem. I was asking Dennis if perhaps temperature and humidy might not have affected it. In any case, I hope he takes us up on our offer to fix the problem for him.


Bharat
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #11 
Bharat, ever the gentleman. 8)
I hope I didn't offend you.
Sometimes a 'lemon' slides through.
Do we have the info as to when Dennis bought it & when it self-detonated?

It would be interesting to find out just what kinds of pressures are exerted on various parts of the sitar. I'm still amazed when I look at the back end of sitars why they don't just pull off. It's gotta be something to do with counter pressure from the string going over the bottom angle.
I still think instruments like this are works of ingenuity.

As Bharat said there are many reasons as to why a sitar 'falls apart'. Why this one should start so soon, I presume, after Dennis bought it may remain a mystery. That or it just didn't like his 'atmosphere'.

We all 'know' sitars are living creatures subject to all manner of temperaments.

A similar incident happened to a AAK style sarod I brought back to the UK for a friend. The top headstock split apart & had to re-glued. It may have had something to do with over-tuning ie tuning all the chickaris to SA rather than GA PA etc. Why she thought she needed 6 SAs is beyond me. :roll:

Nick
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Anonymous

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Posts: 987
Reply with quote  #12 
I understand that once the basket full of feathers is set out, the wind will disperse the feathers and you can never get them back in the basket.

The problem is that I don't believe that this sitar is a lemon or that any "lemons" could get through our scrutiny. Our sitars are checked during the construction process, then individually checked before being selected. Then they are played and adjusted if necessary. We only get the best sent to us. Once here, they are again checked, tuned and re-examined before shipping to the end customer.

The problems Dennis is commenting on, I know they happen, but in my 30 plus years of studying sitar, I have never had this happen with the taraf anchor and I have never heard of it before until now as other have commented on the same problem.

We know, from comments by others on this forum, that when the sitars are put in direct sunlight, the shellac has problems. I know Tony has addressed the issue a comple of times.

In any case, we have offered to replace the sitar for Dennis. If Dennis does return it, our tech will examine it thoroughly and determine what went wrong with it.

We take so much care to offer only the very best. Although possible for some sitars to slip by that may have hidden problems, I find that it would be very unlikely.

The important thing is that we are here to help and will be more than happy to assist Dennis or anyone else even if they didn't buy their sitar from us.

Bharat
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Anonymous

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Posts: 987
Reply with quote  #13 
hi,

gotta chime in here for a second. my first sitar was a manoj kumar #3 from the AACM a bunch of years ago. they problems i experienced with it were, altough no quite sever sounding as yours but were similar. i broke strings constantly dispite sanding the points of string contact where theyre might be rough edges, the paint flaked up all over the main gourd and i had a really hard time keeping it in tune. this sitar was most definitely a lemon. the Bruceji and the AACM store offered to replace my sitar for free (even paid for shipping!) and i upgraded about $100 to the #2. i had none of the same problems.

i spoke with a few makers about the paint thing and they said it was probably either because the gourd was not allowed to completely dry before the paint was put on, or it was made in the wrong environment (monsoon season for example). ive never heard of this happening to the french polish on the sitar.

while i do believe Bharatji is serious about his standards for sitar, but i just dont see any way to check for these types of faults unless you take a sitar home and practice on it a few hours a day for a couple of weeks. (the paint thing only happend my my sitar ofter i started playing it, and only under my arm and foot.) so basically what im saying, with no disprespect to you Bharatji, is that it is totally possible in my humble opinion, that you got a lemon.

good luck,

joshf
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dennis

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Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #14 
Bharat has shown to me that he is a man of the Highest Charector and Integrity, although I've had my share of bad luck with this experience on this instrument, I dont blame the maker, seller or buyer. In addition, as Bharat has said he has played this Sitar and it was very sweet sounding is correct. This Sitar sounded great. I have played this for over 2 hours per day since I got it at the end of January.
On the other hand- I have also respected it, treated it with great care. I just think it happens from time to time. I understand from reading this forum that repairs are needed. My apologies to Sitarsect, as I should 've called them before even asking about any of these problems. I was hoping for a "quick fix" so I could be playing late into the night and was surprised to have Bharat respond even late evening to my concerns on personal email. Thank you all for your helpful comments and suggestions.
I have the upmost respect for Bharat and Sitarsect and beleive we can resolve this manor in an exceptable way.
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Anonymous

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Posts: 987
Reply with quote  #15 
hello,

it sounds as if you think i was telling you to blame Sitarsetc for your misfortune, i just want to clarify that i was not. what i ment to say, is the opposite, its not the vendor's fault, its impossible to know what will happen to an instrument as time goes on. i was saying that although Bharatji gave the instrument a through goingover, and i'm sure he did, there's still no real way to know weather the finish is going to peal, or if an endpin will break, etc. . .lemons in disguise. . .:-)

joshf
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