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Blind Lemon Mike

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hey, 

since my first main Instrument is Guitar (Jazz/Blues/Rock/Pop) i am curious if you guys do transcriptions of Tans and things among those lines. 

In Jazz, transcribing Solos is quite common practice. I,  for instance do "transcribe" solos off of  records, but usually do not really notate them in staff notation, i just figure them out. 

For Alap i think, this is not quite so usefull, but for fast tans especially, do you transcribe some from records at all, and if the answer is yes, how do you notate them?

Paper and Pencil ? What form of notation? 

Does anyone of you know if there is a swaralipi notation programm. I use Musescore a lot, which is great (keeping in mind that it is free...) and can do quite a lot of unusual stuff (like medieval mensural notation...) but i have not found something that is designed for indian music. 

Since there are several books available ( für instance the Rueckert- Ali Akbar Khan Book) that use this notation I assume there is some sort of Program for that use-case ? 

regards
Michael



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Tomek Regulski

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yes - it's definitely common practice, and becoming comfortable in writing sargam notation is something that is a common step for students. My first teacher made me write out all the main parts we covered at the end of a lesson and then show it to him so he could make sure it was correct. 

Notating alap becomes more abstract, but I found it useful in the beginning, and still do it from time to time if I find something interesting that I want to make note of. Usually, though, I just pause after a line and, like you do, "figure it out". I'll do that with taans, etc as well, but then if I want to keep it as a reference I'll write it in my notebook. 

But yeah - I just do it by hand. I don't know of any programs, though I wouldn't be surprised if one existed. I like hand writing, though. I composed music on staff notation, and I always handwrite at least the first full draft. There's a different connection to it, at least in my experience. 
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Lars

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Reply with quote  #3 
You can try this, it's basically like step-editing and takes time.
https://sargamdev.wordpress.com/

Lars

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dhatitdha

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Reply with quote  #4 
@Blind Lemon Mike , please check my notation software http://vishwamohini.com/music/home.php.
It is free web application to notate, play and share Indian music notations and Tabla compositions, currently 450+ compositions are shared on website.

I think it may serve your purpose.
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barend

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Reply with quote  #5 
Yes I have transcribed many things from the great sitar players and also other instruments and vocal. Always in sargam not western notation. But I just do it by pencil. That's the fastest way.
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Blind Lemon Mike

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Reply with quote  #6 
@dhatitdha Very interesting indeed. Looks to be very intuitive. I will try it out.

@barend Yes, always in sargam. I also want to keep those things seperated in my head. At the very beginning i was thinking in Jazz-Terms about Indian-Classical Music. For instance in Raag Yaman "oh, thats a lydian scale and the upward motion is as if you would substitute a m7-Arpeggio starting at the 7th Scale degree..." Leads to more confusion than anything, even if this is indeed a common jazz-substitution. 

@Tomek Regulski 

I also do write per hand and find it very useful. But it is more that i think one can remember things better. For instance, in university i would always take notes, but then throw them away and learn out of a book. Its just to keep the attention and let it "sink in" more. For music, i actually do sometimes copy music from staff notation ( liek counterpoint stuff for instance) just to "develop a feeling" for it. Since my writing is not so nice, i prefer to actully read from notation-software stuff, since it is so much more clear, visually. 


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geezerjazz

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Reply with quote  #7 
I take runs from recordings, but don’t bother to write them down. I just practice making variations on them.

I do find it useful to theorize in jazz terms—but only sometimes, when it helps me relate new knowledge to old knowledge, or to discover new insights. For example, I sometimes hear Yaman as D major pentatonic over C. Or try Todi as B maj pentatonic over C—not exactly traditional, but it gives you some interesting sounds to practice and play around with.

Other ragas seem impervious to western theorizing. I could say that Gunkali is phrygian with 7th and 3rd left out. But that seems wrong, given that ICM hears those missing notes as natural. I could theorize Chandrakauns as an altered pentatonic, but that doesn’t give me any new insight or utility, so I don’t.
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