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musicslug

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Reply with quote  #16 
I've had a delrin bridge on my vina (with them giant gauge strings...) since 2006. my teacher would touch up the jawari practically every week for the first 5 months I had it, so I'll estimate that it's been 'done' for about 7 years. since I play it 2-3 hours a day, that comes out to 900 hrs./yr, so, @ 7 years, that equals 6300 hours, and it hasn't needed a bit of touch-up. yay delrin!
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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #17 
Hey there, Rex. Very happy to hear the delrin bridges are working out for you. Glad I could be of service. 4,000 hours ! I will have to quote you when anybody asks me about delrin. I have quite a few rough blocks of white delrin cut to the original 1/2" ( deer horn dimensions ) spec along with the newer 3/8" blocks. Musicslug - 6,300 hours on a veena ! I'm writing these numbers down to include with future bridge sales. Thank you both for the stats on your delrin bridges. Yeah Delrin ! ! !
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fossesitar

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Reply with quote  #18 
In the late 60s when I returned from India with my Hemen, there were, needless to say, virtually no sitaristas and certainly no sitar forum. I was full of enthusiasm after spending a year with UVK, and quickly ran the bone jawari of my Hemen into the ground. Having no where else to turn, I did my own jawari and soon had ruined my original bridge and two others as well. What a Godsend a delrin bridge would have been for me then!! My enthusiasm and playing time were adversely effected to say the least.

I just want to state again, Tony K has "the knack" and one of his "ballpark" open jawari (made without any access to your sitar for final fitting, which is done instead by you) is infinitely superior to "getting by" or doing your own, at least for most of us. Self installation is doable, but doing your own jawari is, in my experience, not a wise choice for the average player. I have heard repeated here on the forum that UVK could do his own jawari. I am sure that is true in an emergency, but he always took his jawari to one particular man at the Rikhi Ram shop in Delhi to get it done, on a regular basis. I know because he took me there with him for this purpose (jawari) on one occasion and introduced me to that jawari meister, and others in the shop, like a proud father. If UVK had his jawari done by a specialist, shouldn't we?

It is SUCH a boon - time wise, money wise, hassle wise, practice wise, and every other-wise, to have a jawari that lasts for thousands and thousands of hours - you cannot even find wear lines on the surface of the bridge after thousands of hours!

I only wish delrin had been the bridge material on the '63 Hemen that I brought back with me from India. I would be a better player today if it had. GF
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Sitarfixer

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Reply with quote  #19 
Ya'll must be wondering how a "ballpark" jawari can have such good results when shaped without having the instrument to fit it on. Over the years and miles, I've had the opportunity to work on great sitarists instruments. Lucky me, you bet ! Ravi Shankars Nodu sitars were held, loved on, stroked on and examined at every opportunity. I would just stare at the bridges and burn into my mind what those damned things looked like. Getting that airfoil shape into memory and then recreating that shape onto new bridge stock is generally what the ballpark is all about. While in Japan, a sitar fanatic brought his sitar to the hotel wanting to do a side by side comparison to Ravijis #1 Nodu sitar. Of course I underdtood his desire and accomodated him to the fullest extent. Turns out the sitar he brought along came from Hiren Roy, was fourty years old and was never touched upon receipt. I spent nearly three hours just staring at that bridge and how the whole thing was set up while he's taking measurements and photos. One of Shujaat Khans sitars also got the 3rd, degree when he brought it to my house. Under ideal conditions, having the sitar at hand allows for correct bridge height, slot spacing, etc. along with having the owner/player right there to direct the final tone according to his/her ears. Ballpark orders come with requested dimensions and sound preferences. I then set up the bridge based on those specs and my mental images, look over the finished product with fanatical obsession making sure the light reflects off the surface evenly and then when it looks to be somewhere in left center field, it gets boxed up and shipped. " Play ball " ! ! !
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