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Kirya

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Reply with quote  #16 
Raag Hanskinkini also uses both G and g though not as closely together as in Jog

http://www.tanarang.com/english/hans-kinkini_eng.htm


I recommend listeing this to see how the G and g are used



I think Piloo is also another where both G and g are used together in a very clear way though again not quite like Jog

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Kirya
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Tristan von Neumann

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Reply with quote  #17 
Thanks, but the question was really about Komal and Shuddha directly next to each other.

A lot of Ragas use both in vakra motions, but that's because it is necessary to avoid the half tone steps.

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Tomek Regulski

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Reply with quote  #18 
I have heard certain Dagarbhani Dhrupad artists move linearly through two adjacent versions of a note. I have not heard this done in any sort of step-wise motion, but rather always with exact execution of meend to connect it all in a way that preserves the mood of the raga.

I have heard Z M Dagar employ this liberally in raga Bihag, and I have seen the Gundecha Brothers demonstrate this in several ragas, including Khammaj, Jog (as you've already pointed out), and Shuddha Sarang. I am sure there are other ragas that feature this kind of treatment. 

This would not be chromaticism, though, as these motions are only done within the confines of what is considered diatonic within each respective raga, including the decision of which sruti(s) to emphasize within the gesture. I think the closest thing to chromaticism within the scope of raga music would be the idea of ragamala - the bringing in of other ragas within a performance of a primary raga. 

Regarding your question about enharmonic ragas, I think I understand the definition of the term that you are referring to here, i.e. to an interval smaller than a semitone that represents a lower version of a note, like when a chamber ensemble "tunes a chord" some of the members will make a choice to raise or lower a pitch depending on its role in the harmony. I think there is actually one example I have come across that uses something like this, which is the raga Bhimpalasi. I have seen it taught in a way where komal ni and komal ga each can be tuned higher or lower, depending on the phrase. 

Bhimpalasi ascends S g m P n S' and descends S' n D P m g R S

So, in general terms, ni will either ascend to Sa, or descend to Pa through Dha; and ga will either ascend to Pa or descend to Sa through Re. 

Again referencing Dagarbhani Dhrupad, I have heard it mentioned several times that in the case of each note, a higher sruti will be intoned in an ascending phrase, and a lower one will be intoned in a descending phrase. This has been emphasized as specific and essential to Bhimpalasi in this style.

You can also connect these two versions of one of these notes more directly. For instance, you can sing something like SgRSnSn---, using the higher sruti of komal ni, and then as you hold ni, gradually shift to its lower sruti (usually through some use of andolan), and then proceed nDP. As you can imagine, this is a rich pivot point to shift between the two tetrachords of the raga. You can apply this same idea to komal ga with phrases that tie to MaPa vs. ReSa. The symmetry in this raga is amazing.

I hope that this post both makes sense and is helpful.
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barend

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Reply with quote  #19 
A teacher once taught me this phrase in Bhairavi: dPmMg (the d being an embellishment of P, so actually 4 half steps in a row). That was the closest thing to chromatic that I have came across.

Sometimes in Bhairavi you can even use SNn or SNnNS. But that's more of a modern approach I guess. I have heard it but not very often.
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Tristan von Neumann

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Reply with quote  #20 
Thanks for these examples!

In case of Bhairavi, I'm not sure if I can apply it to older music, as the scale changed considerably during the last centuries, but nonetheless interesting.
I have never heard the phrase though - a recording would be amazing, if you know one!
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barend

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Reply with quote  #21 
Not sure about the exact recording but if you listen closely to many Bhairavi recordings you will come across these type of fragments for sure.
Check for example this VK recording. Around 2:00 he is playing DdPd and later around 4:10 he is playing a meend with PMmMmg.

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