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barend

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "mayer141"
I would personally hate to be pigeon holed in to a Gharana. I think a comment was made earlier about having to 'earn' your way in to a Gharana!!!!!!!!
It's that whole scene of 'belonging' that really p*%&^&^ me off about ICM. I love my instrument, I love NB, UVK, RS......I've learned from Senia, Maihar and Etawah teachers and have learnt so much from all of them (and I'm still learning on a daily bases).

I 'belong' to the Manor House Gharana, which is a small province in North London :wink:
Great post!

Yes, I feel that way too. Why should you 'belong' to a gharana anyway? When you are born in India or when you are the child of a musical family or gharana, ok. But when you are living outside India? You can pick what you like from whatever gharana. I like some things from SP and some things from RS and NB and take from them whatever I want and mix it altogether. That way you can come to an individual style and not just become a copy of your master.

That is how I did it with other (western) instruments. Why should it be different with sitar?
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John

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Reply with quote  #32 
Good to see Mewati getting a mention!

I spent some time sat with Ustad Siraj Khan in Jan this year, after meeting him in the UK in 2010. I will be visiting again this comming Jan. A prominent feature of the training/talim I received from him was/is that of 'merukhand'. My pervious teacher, who introduced me to Khansaheb, used to say '...all of their music comes from merukhand...'; referring to the Mewati gharana's systematic approach to the construction of taans from the merukhand patterns.
For those unfamiliar with the term (and I make no claims of expertise here!), merukhand can be described (somewhat oversimplified) as mastery of note combination patterns within a rag, such as 2-note, 3-note, 4-note...
Two notable masters of this technique, other than those of the Mewati tradition, are Ustad Amir Khan (quite well documented) and Pandit Nikhil Banerjee (less well documented, but I definitely read it somewhere). Can't help feeling I'm going to get flamed for saying that...

EDIT:

Whilst we're on the subject of gharanas and Amir Khansaheb... iirc, he claimed no allegiance to this gharana or that gharana. Opting instead to draw influnce from many. Didn't do him any harm!

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plectum

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Reply with quote  #33 
Merukhand is the set of all the possible 7-note phrases comprising the suddha swaras used once only. There are a total of 7x6x5x4x3x2x1 = 5040 combinations.
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John

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Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "plectum"
Merukhand is the set of all the possible 7-note phrases comprising the suddha swaras used once only. There are a total of 7x6x5x4x3x2x1 = 5040 combinations.
Yes, that is the end-goal, but also something to steadily work towards. My first encounter with the technique was 2-note patterns: S R, R S, R G, G R... etc... then 3-note patterns: S R G, R S G, S G R, G S R, R G S, G R S...R G M...etc... Then 4-note... you get the idea. This is then expanded to include bol patterns and so on... It's a steep learning curve, but quite satisfying when you 'get it'.

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David Russell Watson

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Reply with quote  #35 
I belong to Gora-Farang Gharana.

We're known not so much for our tans, as our lack thereof.



David
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nicneufeld

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Reply with quote  #36 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "David
I belong to Gora-Farang Gharana.

We're known not so much for our tans, as our lack thereof.
Nice!
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John

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "nicneufeld"
Quote:
Originally Posted by "David
I belong to Gora-Farang Gharana.

We're known not so much for our tans, as our lack thereof.
Nice!
Ha ha. Yeah, good one!

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pfintucson

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Reply with quote  #38 
Just read this old thread with great interest. Someone talked about different right hand technique, which I don't quite understand.Left-hand, meend style, is obvious to me but what right hand differences are in Imdadkhani style as opposed to Maihar style? I always thought it was basically the same....
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #39 
Just check out Pt Ravi Shankar's right hand & then look at Ustad Shahid Parvez's!!!!

NUFF SED!!!

Nick
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