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BobK

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Reply with quote  #1 
My dry gandhar pancham jawari seems to be shifting after two years and one-to-two hours a day of practice. I now pretty much suddenly have a shimmering twang--unexpected and unwanted. Is it likely that this would happen so soon? Is it only due to use, or can it be affected by climate change (temperate to tropical)? Also, is it even likely that closed jawari would open? And which happens more easily: closed to open or open to closed? And finally, could the new sound be due to something else entirely?

Thanks,

Bob
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povster

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Reply with quote  #2 
Consider yourself lucky if you have been getting in 1-2 hours a day for 2 years and only now your jawari is impacted enough to start troubling you!

Closed to open is very common, much more common than open to closed. it is the natural progression of the sound as a groove is cut into the jawari and the buzziness starts happening.

The new sound could be due to other factors. Somehoiw the bridge shifted. there may be some foreign substance under the string on the bridge that is causing the buzz.

Replace the string. Take a soft cloth and wipe down the bridge (avoid getting finegr oils on it). If you don;t have a spare string handy wipe the string down thoroughly wiuth a cloth
But overall? I think it is just time for a jawari shapening.

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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #3 
Sounds like you just need a Jawari done.
Two years is a long time for a Jawari that is played every day.
That is the nature of the beast.
Most Jawari jobs could last as long as a year, but played everyday for a few hours it is unlikely.

As for Open and Closed Jawari, I would think that the Closed Jawari should last a little longer than the Open jawari.
But they both do not last very long. A heavy practice schedule should wear down your Jawari every six months or so.
The key is to find someone near you that can carve a good Jawari and have it maintained regularly.
There is nothing better than a brand new Jawari.
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BobK

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks to both of you.

Now: I would not consider shipping my sitar across the border, especially since I would have to pay a hefty import tax when it returned. Do any of our US-based jawariwallahs ever get to Mexico (Caribbean coast)? Please send me a private message if you have any ideas. Thanks,

Bob
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rex@sitar.co.za

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Bob,

I imagine that you don't need a full jawari reshaping, merely a touch up. I do this regularly every 4-8 weeks. Just gently file away any grooves created by the strings, making sure too follow the curvature of the bridge so you don't change it's shape. It should just take a few minutes, and you should notice a huge difference. A good jawari can last quite a while this way.

The last professional reshaping I had done was in Bombay in 2005 by a top pro. It's lasted me just fine till now, with heavy practise, and just the occasional touch up.

- Rex
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BobK

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Reply with quote  #6 
Rex,

Thanks. I've seen the well-known illustrated on-line article about jawari, and it seems like pretty risky do-it-yourself work. What kind of file (or sandpaper?) would I use if I end up trying to do this on my own?

Bob
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element-82

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Posts: 317
Reply with quote  #7 
Hey bob,
I would recommend using a foam sanding block. They are fairly stiff and very forgiving for the first time. I messed up several with chisels and files before I was shown the foam block trick. Take the bridge off and sit it on a table or somewhere flat. Hold it with one hand and focus sanding on the top but with a little pressure where the string slots are and gently sand in one direction until the groove is gone. It is a very difficult thing to do from scratch, but if you just need to fix one it is a lot easier.

good luck,
email or pm me if you have any questions
Pb
Quote:
Originally Posted by "BobK"
Rex,

Thanks. I've seen the well-known illustrated on-line article about jawari, and it seems like pretty risky do-it-yourself work. What kind of file (or sandpaper?) would I use if I end up trying to do this on my own?

Bob

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rex@sitar.co.za

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Posts: 674
Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Bob,

A touch-up is pretty risk free, and very easy, at least in my experience. I had to learn to do this myself when I first started learning sitar as there was no one around to do it for me. You need a file for filing metal (a jeweller's file?). I've never messed up a bridge, but maybe I've just been lucky. Just file away the grooves, maintaining the original shape, and you should be just fine. I've never used a foam sanding block, but it sounds like a good idea. Like changing strings, I think this is something sitarist should learn to do themselves anyway as part of basic maintenance. And, there are no better teachers than Trial and Error
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