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AnahataNada

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Hello,

I'm somewhat technologically challenged, so pardon my ignorance. I'm looking for a simple microphone that I can use for my sitar during jam sessions or intimate house concerts. I hate getting drowned out by other instruments in those settings. I'd prefer something that's low-maintenance. If I can find it on Amazon, even better! I appreciate any feedback.
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Hamletsghost

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Reply with quote  #2 
Sennheiser MD421

Used on sitars - sarods - etc etc - cello - violins
One of the greatest stringed instrument mics ever produced.
I've personally used this mic on indian stringed instuments since the early 80's
Tried all the rest - this is the best
(unless you want to spend about 1500+)

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Tomek Regulski

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Reply with quote  #3 
In any kind of band setting, a contact microphone is your best bet, at least in my experience. This allows you to dial in a good level without risking feedback. I've been using the AKG C411 and really appreciate the results. Even when playing solo on stage, I like to blend the C411 with a standard mic. 
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Angelo Esmanhotto

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I use on my Sarod the Shertler Pickup.
http://www.shertler.com  for me the best one!!!!
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Sillofthedoor

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Reply with quote  #5 


Usually for live work a dynamic, rugged and no power requirements: 

I go for the sennheisers:
sennheiser MD421(can't go wrong it also has various settings which may make it the winner...anyone?) or 422(never caught on instrument version of the MD421) or, the Md 441 (fantastic looking! but more expensive)even better.

I have the MD431 which is actually v.similar to the 441 (same capsule etc) but less known (cheaper on ebay!!) and has the advantage of being built more like a normal microphone so fits onto more mic holders  (all the others above are rather distinct shapes requiring their own specific mic clamps, in fact the MD 431's only real problem is the silly mic attachment piece. ).  

They are all hypercardioid or similar, which pretty much a basic requirement for an instrument mic.   

Neumann KM range are reputed to be the best (of course), but are insanely expensive and are also said to be very fragile (an issue more usually associated with condensers).  Of course most sitar gigs are not that rock and roll (any stories there?  If they are all groupies and ketamine backstage they keep pretty closed lip about it....)..so its isn't as likely to get dropped......

A contact mike is very easy to use once you have figured out where to place it on the body for the best sound. and has the advantage that because it attaches to the body and picks the sound directly from that vibration rather than through the air, you have little to no feedback problems which can be a real issue for the sitar.  Ravi Shankar used a schertler agin a bit expensive for piezo which can be very cheap indeed, and i have no idea what their internal working are that justify that expense.   You really want a preamp for that in many circumstances.  RL baggs make nice little ones.

Its worth considering the AKG c411 which is contact mike but actually a condenser (so needs phantom power, there are two versions offering different ways of getting that, which might put you off if you just want to plug it into an amp) I got that an love it, far better than any cheaper piezo i tried but still good value.  
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Sitar Fixer

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Reply with quote  #6 
AKG C411. It's a contact mic yet requies phantom power and a 3 pin XLR jack. In other words, it's a condenser mic that puts out superb sound.
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Ian S. Cophin

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Reply with quote  #7 
My teacher recommends K+K: https://kksound.com/products/hotspot.php

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Kirya

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Reply with quote  #8 
I use a Myers mic described here though mine is older 



I use a Myers mic described here though mine is older  https://www.myerspickups.com/pickups/the-feather-series    and find that it works well in a band situation where you have electric guitars and electric bass and vocals who are all lkely to be amplified.

I also use a cheapish Fishman pre-amp to boost the mid-range and make it less trebly.


Here is a soundcloud example of what it sounds like recorded straight from the control console with electric guiar and bass coming through same console

THe mic is about $150 and the Fishman preamp is about $150 too

Fishman Platinum Stage EQ/DI Analog Preamp


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Kirya
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Buddha Systems

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https://www.facebook.com/Buddha-Systems-353527718353431/

This contact mic is made mainly for sitar. No external mic is needed anymore even in classical settings.
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Kirya

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Reply with quote  #10 
Do you have more technical details about it on a web page maybe?

The samples sound good but don't explain connectivity and setup. 

Volume or sensitivity adjustments?

How long a cable?

What kinds of connections?

Does it need a pre-amp?

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Kirya
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AnahataNada

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Reply with quote  #11 
Thanks for the feedback, everyone! I ended up getting a John Pearse transducer with a Fender Acoustasonic 15 Amp. The combo works perfectly!
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