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Surbaharplayer

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Reply with quote  #1 
I've uploaded another video of the workshop Bahauddin Dagar gave on april 1st at the Rotterdam Conservatorium (WMDC):



More to come...
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westsea

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Reply with quote  #2 
Words are not enough to thank you and Bahauddin for making these videos available.

Please let Bahauddin know how appreciated this is.
These are rare gifts.
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CheesecakeTomek

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Reply with quote  #3 
These videos have been very inspiring, and it is very exciting to hear that there are more on the way. Many thanks.

-Tomek
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panchamkauns

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Reply with quote  #4 
One of the major gaps in my basic music understanding is the sthai, antara, abhog and sanchari parts of alap. I have tried to read up on them from several sources but I’m still not sure if I understand. His demonstration here was short and perfunctory — I still don’t think I understand.
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CarnaticConnection

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Reply with quote  #5 
Sthai, antara, sanchari, and abhog are actually still debated among the dhrupadiyas and banis, and there is no "set definition" of them. Some feel as though it should follow the old rules founded around the time of the Sangit Ratnakara, the ancient musical anthology and guide. In the Ratnakara, they are very basically described as a method of approaching higher and higher notes until the climax, where the highest Sa is reached. The Dagars, for example, perform their alap in middle octave, then extensive lower octave exploration, then middle--->higher octave, reaching the pinnacle and beyond, and then back down to the middle Sa. Most, if not all, do not follow the strict examples of the Ratnakara, but it is a basic guideline. When one section ends and another begins is very blurred and debated, and not always does a performer use all four sections in an alap.

The other usage of these terms is in the bandish, where each may be a line of poetry, since dhrupad bandishes are usually composed of four lines. However, six-line dhrupads are also found, as are other numbers of lines, and the distinction isn't really used as much in performance as it is usually just a technique for dissecting a performance.

I have a limited understanding as well, but if you listen to a full Dagar alap you can basically see four distinct sections, and these sort of follow a pattern from performance to performance. Hope this helped a bit!
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John

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Reply with quote  #6 
Fantastic. Thank you so much for these videos.
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