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gatabera

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hey just wanted to see if any of you are sri lankan or from sri lanka. For those of you who don't know...the tabla is also played in sri lanka, but the playing style is a little different from what you find in India. Cheers!!

Gatabera
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luvdasitar

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Reply with quote  #2 

Thats great to know!! So how is it difeerent..can u point to links ?

I would have thought that there would be more mridangam players if anything.
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gatabera

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Reply with quote  #3 
Well I am actually not an expert on the topic, but basically this is what I have observed: In Sri Lankan light classical (what is refered to as "sri lankan classical") the tabla player usually plays in dadra or keherwa taals. You rarely see teen tal or any of the other taals being played. The other thing is that there is a lot of embelishment of the taal with the bayan. Its actually similar to what you hear in gazals. Anyway unfortunately I don't know of any links of websites that discuss this topic in detail. The next best thing would be to post sample music. I searched on the internet and found some music on a famous Sri Lankan classical artist: Amaradeva. He is the father of modern sri lankan "classical" music. Please check out the wikipedia article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandith_Amaradeva

Here is some music (sorry sound quality is not great):

http://www.infolanka.com/miyuru_gee/con/c452.ram
http://www.infolanka.com/miyuru_gee/con/c50.ram
http://www.infolanka.com/miyuru_gee/nn/n410.ram

Hope you enjoy the music. Comments are welcome
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drummerboy

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Reply with quote  #4 
I'm Sri Lankan and play tabla but i'm learning from an Indian Teacher. I'm also going to start learning Gata Bera. Do you Play Gata bera?
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gatabera

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Reply with quote  #5 
Hey drummer boy,

Kohomadha! Actually I have played it once in sri lanka while on holiday, when I took some Kandyian dance lessons. Wow that is cool to find a fellow sri lankan in the forum. Are you learning in the states or in sri lanka or another country? There is actually a very beautiful sri lankan drum, called the madhala that I would also love to learn, but I don't know of anyone giving lessons here. I actually like the sri lankan style of playing the tabla. It's very beautiful. Hey if you can share any resources, taals, and any knowledge of the tabla in a sri lankan context, that would be most welcome. Of course I would be glad to do the same. Take care brother..
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drummerboy

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Reply with quote  #6 
I'm learning in New Jersey. I wasn't really sure that the sri lankan tabla playing was that different though. My parents listen to Amaredeva and victor ratnayake and all that stuff, i like some of it. I know those tabla players learned from an indian teacher, i'm not really sure, i think his name is Afaq hussain Khan. There's also a CD, its a sri lankan tabla player, Wijayarathna Ranathunga, It's all percussion, like tabla, and bera, and other sri lankan drums. Also, there's a sri lankan musician, Pradeep Ratnayake, he plays sitar in the style of ravi Shankar, and he's mixed it with sri lankan folk music and jazz. He has this whole troupe, there not bad, ill try to get some of the stuff online, or if u hav an AIM adress i can send it directly. Aight. Peace.
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Tablaseek

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Guys,
I am a Sri Lankan based in Australia. I tried to reply your message a while ago but had problems with logging in. Then I re-registered last night.
I visit the forum whenever I can but have been silent because of the logging in difficulties. It would not accept my name/pw etc. Anyway, it has decided to accept it now. I wonder if it drops the name/pw if one does not use it for a while.

I have had a Nepalese teacher who is excellent. He is a student of Ustad Tari Khan. Since moving to another State, I do not get any lessons, but practice often. I enjoy the occasional sing-along parties. I have also gone on stage a few times.
Hope we can be in touch.
Cheers
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #8 
When I was in Bangalore I went to meet a friend called Srinivas who makes tabla/mridangam skins as well as playing them both. Now HIS style is the Karnatik version. I played in one of the temples nearby with a bhajan group and he recognised it as Hindusthani style tabla. Unfortunately I didn't make a recording/video.

Nick
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zennman

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Reply with quote  #9 
The Sri Lankan drumming styles look closer to the Chenda (and the Chenda mandalam) drumming style of Kerala than any Tamil styles I am aware of. Also, I don't think there is a carnatic style of tabla playing per se. What it usually is, is mridangam players taking up tabla as a way to get more gigs (song recordings, light music concerts etc.). Apart from the rhythmic cycles and rapid calculations they are already familiar with, they also bring a really 'heavy' hand to the tabla. Mridangam skins are very thick, and the players are used to applying more force than necessary for the tabla. It is actually quite scary to watch a mridangam player try out a tabla for the first time.

So, the carnatic tabla playing style is mostly rudimentray carnatic drumming principles applied to light classical and film music, with strong and consistent strokes. The variations in tekas is minimal, but a variety of colorful 'pickups'/mukras and tihais are employed. The most striking feature is the lack of subtleties in the playing. Bayan modulations are precise and firm and rarely vary with repetition, and dayan strokes are loud and driving.
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gatabera

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
So, the carnatic tabla playing style is mostly rudimentray carnatic drumming principles applied to light classical and film music, with strong and consistent strokes. The variations in tekas is minimal, but a variety of colorful 'pickups'/mukras and tihais are employed. The most striking feature is the lack of subtleties in the playing. Bayan modulations are precise and firm and rarely vary with repetition, and dayan strokes are loud and driving.
Do you have any samples? Does mridangam repetoire have something similar to kaidas, relas, and peshkar? I don't know if the sri lankan tabla players play in a similar style, but it would be interesting to find out the history of sri lankan tabla players.

Comment for drummer boy: Hey I actually went to Pradeeps concert. In my opinion its more light classical, than classical. It was cool music though. I think the tabla player you mentioned performed with him, correct? What is the name of the sri lankan percussion CD?
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gatabera

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hey I found this article on Wijayarathna Ranatunga: a famous sri lankan tabla player.

http://sundaytimes.lk/061203/Plus/03_12_2006Pls14.html

I would love to get my hands on that book he wrote. Anyone know what the title is?
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Aruna Maheepala

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Reply with quote  #12 
I'm Sri Lankan teacher and learning tabla from a Guru who is an expert tabla player. I see no difference. We learn teen tal , keherwa,
japtal ,Dadra etc. we practice with tekhas,kaydas ,paltas also. and light music for songs. But I feel if somebody plays sri Lankan Drums(Gatabera or Pahatarata bera ) he feels difficult to play tabla (especially bols like tireketa ) as bols are different and tabla is played softly than Gatabera and pahatarata bera.
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gatabera

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Reply with quote  #13 
Thanks Aruna for your insight. You made some good points that I didn't think about. I appreciate your contribution to this thread .

Gatabera
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gatabera

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Reply with quote  #14 
Some sad news. This is a bit old, but I just found out today:
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gatabera

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Reply with quote  #15 
Some more sri lankan tabla playing:




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