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element-82

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Reply with quote  #16 
The iron wood/lignum vitae sounds interesting. Man, ebony is hard enough to work, I can only imagine this iron wood.

Purple heart is another option. It sounds quite nice. I don't know about the durability.

Back to the topic...
I primarily was sold on ebony because it was available and I love the sound. You can buy a decent enough sized piece of it to make 20 jawari for about $40. But the quality is hit and miss. YOu don't want sapwood and preferably old is better. I found a few pieces that were sitting around someone's shop for 20 years, waxed edges, it is great stuff.

Back off topic...Synthetics?
I tried corian, but I don't like the sound. Too metalic.

I have a plastic type from sanjay RR, I don't like it. Too twangy for me.

My new surbahar has synth ivory which is growing on me. It is better than corian and plastic but I may swap it out for ebony when I get a chance.

I ordered some delrin (black), so lets see how that sounds. If nothing else, I will make bird and egg fine tuners.

Pb

Quote:
Originally Posted by "cwroyds"
Trippy Monkey,

Here is some info on Lignum Vitae (Very Very Hard wood).
After reading this I noticed that it says that the "grain is highly interlocked, making it difficult to work with edge tools".
That might make it had to carve the jawari.

There are also a lot of blocks of this for sale on ebay.
Maybe I should just get some and have a Jawai made.
Experimentation is the only way anything really changes.

But here is the general info.
you can also see a picture at:
http://www.woodfinder.com/woods/lignumvitae.php

COMMON NAMES: Lignum vitae, Guayacan, Palo santo, ironwood
SPECIFIC GRAVITY: 1.05

DENSITY: 77 - 82 lbs./cu.ft.

TANGENTIAL MOVEMENT: 2.5%

RADIAL MOVEMENT: n/a%

VOLUMETRIC SHRINKAGE: n.a%

DURABILITY: Exceptional resistance to moisture and fungal attack

SOURCE: West Indes, Central America, northern South America

DESCRIPTION: One of the hardest and heaviest woods (three times as hard as oak), lignum vitae is most commonly used for mallet heads, bearings and rollers. Because of its durability and natural lubricants, it is the preferred wood for propeller bushings and other underwater applications. The lignum vitae tree generally grows to a diameter of about 12", although historically, trees in the 18" - 30" range have been known.

Lignum vitae is reddish brown when freshly cut, with pale yellow sapwood. As it oxidizes, the color turns to a deep green, often with black details. The grain is highly interlocked, making it difficult to work with edge tools, but it machines well and takes a high polish. It is a remarkably good wood for turning. A similar species, known as Maracaibo lignum vitae (Bulnesia arboria), which grows in Venezuela and northern South America, is similar in properties and appearance and is sometimes substituted for genuine lignum vitae.

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Hamletsghost

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Reply with quote  #17 
I do tend to agree with Josh and others about hardness etc. AND definately corrian wears fine but sounds like your using porcelain, just too sharp an edge too brittle. Obviously I have made no bones about the fact I am Delrin fan. Great projection, warm & rich & boy does it wear like iron, a topic we've treaded before (see wear data I provided & comments from many on the debate @ http://forums.chandrakantha.com/viewtopic.php?p=18896&highlight=#18896 --- the curved bridge string) While in Chicago over the last many months Tony installed Delrin bridges on dozens of sitars of every description that I have had access to, as he did the work in my workshop & my teachers home, this includes my new Tony K beauty and my older sitar which has had it's Delrin since March and it sounds great with nary a mark. I have heard and played (however poorly ) everything from brand new sitars, to a more rescent Sanjay RR, OLD Hiren Roys, Hemens, Naskars, SenGuptas, Kenai Lals, Rikhi Rams etc etc etc some real museum pieces that are not just collection queens but being used regularily and played in concert, and DELRIN is da thing on all of 'em.
When he installed the bridge on my new sitar The Rose (see string on my new sitar) Tonyda used Kingwood for the legs which gives incredible transmission to the tabli as well as looks sweet. Which brings up a topic that has not been discussed at all, that I can find, but makes real sense--- :?:
HOW much does the wood selected for the bridge LEGS affect the sound of the material used for the actual bridge surface and color the sound transmitted. MOST of the new and old sitars I've seen including brand new multi thousand dollar top of da line big namers as well as masterpiece vintage axe's, the bridge legs look like they were hacked out of shop leavins - definately an afterthought. I believe many I've seen are sheasham or tun scraps. It definately makes sense that a better grade of wood used to transmit the sound from the bridge surface can only help increase the richness of the overall sound.
Possibly this is where ebony or other high quality &/or harder woods of better quality (koa sounds great on guitars & basses -purple heart - kingwood etc) would be better applied. Whatcha tink? HMMMMMMmmmmmm??? :roll:

Hamletsghost 8)

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element-82

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Reply with quote  #18 
Regarding the type of wood for legs, I like mahogany. I have tried oak, which transmitted too much, the tarabs were annoying.

BTW glad to hear that delrin is a good alternative. Thanks,
Pb
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Hamletsghost"
I do tend to agree with Josh and others about hardness etc. AND definately corrian wears fine but sounds like your using porcelain, just too sharp an edge too brittle. Obviously I have made no bones about the fact I am Delrin fan. Great projection, warm & rich & boy does it wear like iron, a topic we've treaded before (see wear data I provided & comments from many on the debate @ http://forums.chandrakantha.com/viewtopic.php?p=18896&highlight=#18896 --- the curved bridge string) While in Chicago over the last many months Tony installed Delrin bridges on dozens of sitars of every description that I have had access to, as he did the work in my workshop & my teachers home, this includes my new Tony K beauty and my older sitar which has had it's Delrin since March and it sounds great with nary a mark. I have heard and played (however poorly ) everything from brand new sitars, to a more rescent Sanjay RR, OLD Hiren Roys, Hemens, Naskars, SenGuptas, Kenai Lals, Rikhi Rams etc etc etc some real museum pieces that are not just collection queens but being used regularily and played in concert, and DELRIN is da thing on all of 'em.
When he installed the bridge on my new sitar The Rose (see string on my new sitar) Tonyda used Kingwood for the legs which gives incredible transmission to the tabli as well as looks sweet. Which brings up a topic that has not been discussed at all, that I can find, but makes real sense--- :?:
HOW much does the wood selected for the bridge LEGS affect the sound of the material used for the actual bridge surface and color the sound transmitted. MOST of the new and old sitars I've seen including brand new multi thousand dollar top of da line big namers as well as masterpiece vintage axe's, the bridge legs look like they were hacked out of shop leavins - definately an afterthought. I believe many I've seen are sheasham or tun scraps. It definately makes sense that a better grade of wood used to transmit the sound from the bridge surface can only help increase the richness of the overall sound.
Possibly this is where ebony or other high quality &/or harder woods of better quality (koa sounds great on guitars & basses -purple heart - kingwood etc) would be better applied. Whatcha tink? HMMMMMMmmmmmm??? :roll:

Hamletsghost 8)

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luvdasitar

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Reply with quote  #19 
Played Nick's sitar with the ebony bridge. Plays like a dream!!!!
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