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yussef ali k

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Posts: 322
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi.
Some time ago a knowledgeable person took his sitar and showed me how, after meending the 4th/3rd/2nd string (and thus going somewhat flat) it could be very much brought up to pitch - or very close to it - by silently meending the 1st string (been told it is a quick move supposed to be done in performance, and while cikari-ing: I've since noticed some pros seemingly doing it): it worked. It works.

Now will someone care to explain why is it so?

Have fun:Thank you in advance.
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fossesitar

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Posts: 983
Reply with quote  #2 
Caused by sliding of the strings in their slots (friction in the nut slot especially) and movements of the neck itself during meend. Meend increases tension on the neck, bowing it more than normal and even causing torsional movements due to the assymetrical layout of the strings on a sitar. When any string is meended - especially "MA" which receives the most extreme meends - all the other stringgs sag in pitch due to the bowing of the neck.

When meending "MA" the kharaj will actually SAG in pitch, allowing the kharaj to slide over the nut TOWARDS the tuning peg. When the "MA: string is released the neck returns to "normal" and friction at the nut slot may bring the kharaj back closer to "normal" as well. Obviously when the kharaj itself is meended it is pulled towards the BRIDGE (over the nut slot) so pulling (meending) on "MA" allows it to slide back over the nut slot to where it started before it was meended.

Think Floyd Rose Tremolo on guitar, which eliminates this problem by snubbing the strings right AT the nut and right AT the bridge.
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yussef ali k

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Posts: 322
Reply with quote  #3 
Hi. (to GF):
Thank you for the reply & 4 sharing your exp's.
Yes: mouche! - trem action in vintage strats used to get me to remove the arm & tighten its springs... & ultimately to sell & go non-trem: although there, 1 needed to tug on the very string, not any other.

It's also probably why other sitar pros tug on the strings at the headstock, what do you think?

Thanks again + have fun.
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