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festus

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Reply with quote  #1 
I just picked up a Rabab @ an antique store on the road.
the symps were there (I'll change them when i get home)
only 1 gut string in the lower register position
and it's bridge is rounded as in the case of a bowed instrument, dilruba,etc.

Are there any Rabab's that are bowed?? or has this been hotrod'ed to be played like a sarangi

Also what are the appropriate string sizes and string material

thanks folks,

Peace
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sarodplayer

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi, as it has a arched bridge which is quite specialised for bowed instruments, it sounds like it could be kind of folk sarangi, called sarinda, there are many types, they look a bit like a rabab, about the same size and shape.

These folk instruments is a very specialised area, you will be lucky to find anyone who really knows anything about them, but the knowledge is special and correct, the world of folk is very complex.

Simon
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festus

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Simon,

I'm hip to the Saranda... I have one

This is definately a Afghani Rabab... The strings and curved bridge is the curve ball for me

Thanks for your thoughts my friend

:wink:

.
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Sazenda

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi,

This must be a late answer but I'm just new on that forum. I've been playing the Afghan rabab for a few years now. Even if I am still a beginner let me tell you what I think about the topic.
In my mind this instrument used to be a bowed instrument. Moreover, I've read somewhere that sarod used to be bowed tool while it was still being modified (can't remember when exactly). In my mind these two instruments were picked and bowed instruments (kind of hybrid) in the same period.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #5 
Just as an observation, the tapered waist of the Rebab would suggest a bowed instrument.
If you look at rebab you will notice how the instrument is pinched inward on the body where one would pick or Bow.
It is similar to a violin or cello in the it allows the angle of the bow to change to bow all strings while not contacting the body.
If it was never meant to be bowed it is hard to see what that design feature would be for.
It seems to be a complexity that would be completely unnecessary to a plucked instrument.
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Sazenda

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Reply with quote  #6 
That is the same on guitar. The presence of ribs on this instrument recalls that its ancestor the vihuela was picked and bowed as well. Although some say it doesn't prove anything...
I should personally consider the goat skin on rabab. String instruments with a goat skin are generally bowed instruments : delruba, sarangi, sarinda, Iranian kamanche, Arabic rebab... whereas many plucked instrument don't have any goat skin.
Moreover the bride on rabab is placed on a very low position. I think this not a natural position. I suppose it has been moved down when they decided to pluck this instrument. Previously this bridge was certainly placed in the middle of the goat skin. This is only suppositions. A specialist in instrument making would tell if it is right or not.
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rababmaster

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Reply with quote  #7 
New reply to old post, but it may help someone. Rabab / rebab / robab / rubab is a generic name for any stringed instrument with a parchment face ... like "saz" means almost any musical instrument. Some rababs are bowed, like the Indonesian gamelan orchestra instrument. The rabab of present-day India-Kashmir-Pakistan-Iran was never bowed. It has a double-chamber like many other unbowed Central Asian and Himalayan instruments for acoustic principles. The most widespread and common bowed rababs are found among the descendents of the Bedouins, and Andalusians of North Africa, and they have no waist, so a waist does not mean an instrument is bowed. Jordi Savall of Hesperion XXI plays an Afghani rabab which he modified, it has no sympathetic strings, with four playing strings, and a curved bridge, as an imitation medieval European instrument. Your instrument may have once been adapted to be played like a sarangi or esraj, with a bow ... on the other hand, old instruments are modified over time, and craftsmen are very few, so somebody may have broken the original bridge on yours, and placed another one on it that is not like the original, like from a sarangi, who knows. I have looked at some of the postings in this thread, and so you no longer have to make so many guesses, I recommend that you find some books by excellent scholars about the sarod, rabab, and sitar by Alyn Jane Miner, Bonnie Wade, John Baily, Mark Slobin, and Lorraine Sakata and others to get started. The tragic thing about the rabab in Afghanistan is that only a few ethnomusicologists were able to study it, for only a few years, before the Soviet invasion, and then the Taliban came, and then the influence of Western and Hindi film music, and much was lost. The most important thing to remember is that the rabab changed over many centuries and has a wide geographical distribution with many variations, so there are no standard tunings or strings. Any "expert" who tells you "Do it THIS way" is only repeating what his or her teacher said. At one time the rabab masters of present-day Afghanistan learned from the ustads of Hindustan, but there was considerable use of rabab by the Persians, who had and still have a complex and beautiful system of music to rival the raga system, and it was also used, and is still used, in Central Asia, where the muqam /maqam system still prevails in traditional music. About the eggshells: the rabab is a sacred instrument, and often has bird motifs inlaid or carved into it, and the shells have a spiritual meaning, the shells mean to be born twice as a bird is, once when the egg is laid, and again when the bird hatches out, like the soul - the human is born, but we need to make a breakthrough to be really human. There are plenty of recordings of rabab from which you can learn, but you have to search for them! (I learned from Ustad Hashem Chisti in the 1970s among other teachers, I live in Portland Oregon USA, and I own six antique rababs, not for sale.)
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