INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hey,

Check out this beautiful 19th century sitar.
http://www.mfa.org/collections/search_art.asp?recview=true&id=50893
Love the decoration and the pegs.
Are those sound holes in the tabli?
Id would love to see it up close so I could figure out what has changed since then in general sitar construction.

There are also other indian instruments in the collection.
http://www.mfa.org/collections/search_art.asp?coll_package=10107&coll_start=21

Just thought you might like to see.
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trippy monkey

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Reply with quote  #2 
Fantastic!!! Well Done!! 8)
God The work on that Beauty!!!!

Might just be decorative counter sunk holes & not sound holes.
Ivory pegs!!??!?!?!
'Wooden' gourd?????
GORGEOUS!!!

Nick
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hey Trippy,

I thought you would appreciate this sitar more than most.
I would love to see a book or museum collection that shows the progression of the developement of the sitar over the centuries. I am assuming that very few of the eary instruments exist today. Do you think there are any examples of sitars before 1800? I would like to find out more. Are there any books out there?
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ragamala

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hey cwroyds

Keep on taking the medication..

Allyn Miner - Sitar and Sarod in the 18th and 19th Centuries

I don't know how you get it (my copy is Motilal Banardidass Publishers Private Limited Delhi 1997) but worth googling for extracts or sources.

There might have been posts on this text before in the forum.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #5 
Very cool Ragmala thanks.
I have seen this book on the web but had not purchased it yet.
I read some bits that are available for preview last night.
Seems really interesting.
It is a shame that there is so little historical reference for sitar.
I have searched the internet many times for new info but have come up short. I was very happy to find this 19th century sitar.
Instruments are fascinating to me. I love them all. I collected many instruments back when I spent a lot of time in Hong Kong.

By the way if you love all kinds of instruments, if you ever get to London and have some time to kill, go to the Victoria & Albert museum and check out their musical instrument collection. It is amaising. Case after case of incredible instruments. I dont remember if they had and Indian instruments. It is a great collection.

And yes I will continue to keep myself well medicated for the next few days. The flu sucks.
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ragamala

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Reply with quote  #6 
If you have the chance do get that Allyn Miner book, fascinating...

Re V&A in London there is a heap of stuff of interest to lovers of Indian culture, including a very valuable collection of paintings. On the instrument front from my memory not much there re Indian stuff. As usual with a coillection like they have most of it is in the basement not for view.

I did though use as a template one of their clavichords for my own build some 25 years ago, which worked really well.
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #7 
OOOOOOh I love clavichords.
Back in the day, I used to play Rennaisance Lute, and I would go to the Early Music Shop on Chiltern Street in London and sit and play the clavichords for hours. The sound is so soft and lovely. Truly beautiful.
I think it is my favourite Keyboard instrument (Other than a Fender Rhodes). Must have been quite a project.
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Jason

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Reply with quote  #8 
Cwroyds, the book "Gloire des, Louange des Dieux Patrimoine musical de l'Hindoustan du XIVe au XXe si├Ęcle" may be right up your alley. I found a copy on French ebay, but I think you can order it from the museum that published it. The text is in French, which is great if you can read it (I can't) but the book is loaded with color photos of antique sitars, sarods, veenas, percussion instruments of all sorts, sarangis, etc. It also has color prints of paintings and sculpture featuring musical scenes. It has over 200 pages with photos or prints on just about every page. I highly recommend it.

Here is a link to the museum that sells it:

http://www.cite-musique.fr/francais/services/boutique/resultat.asp?MenuItem=0618
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Jason.
I saw that one before but didnt buy it because it was in french and kinda pricey, but I guess what I want is the Pictures. I should bite the bullet and get both of these books. I guess I cant bitch about a lack of sitar info out there if I dont go ahead and buy the ones that I know exist.
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luvdasitar

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Reply with quote  #10 
U lil beauty you!!!
Great work cwroyds!!
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rex@sitar.co.za

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Reply with quote  #11 
The Smithsonian Institute has some stunners too, but I haven't been able to find any pictures online. Does anyone know anything about the sitars in the Smithsonian's collection?

- Rex
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sitardoc

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Reply with quote  #12 
HOLY HANDGRENADES CWROYDS!! how'd you stumble upon this treasure of a site?? THANKYOU THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOU!!!!!!!!!!!!
peace
-the doc
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Aanaddha

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by "rex@sitar.co.za"
The Smithsonian Institute has some stunners too, but I haven't been able to find any pictures online. Does anyone know anything about the sitars in the Smithsonian's collection?

- Rex
I don't know where you saw these "stunners" but outside of the MFA in Boston, American museums have little to speak of in their collections of South Asian instruments. I could be wrong (go down to your local museum and ask.) The Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. has a sitar, a vina, and a sarangi as far as I know - mostly decorative firewood donated by some emmisary to President Taft back in 1906 or something. These are in the Anthropology Dept. at the Museum of Natural History. The Museum of American History has a amazing collection of western musical instruments and the Asian Museum has no Indian instruments that I am aware of. There are several musicologists and musical anthropologists at Smithsonian Folkways but they deal strictly with books and recordings. Surprisingly. there are few books and recordings of South Asian music in the Smithsonian Asian museum library itself.

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If he could sing, and nature to accompany him, what need would he have for an instrument?
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azem

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Reply with quote  #14 
wow, isn't that a beauty. the tanpura looks amazing too.
i think those 'holes' are bits where the decoration has fallen out
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