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Michael MacLean

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I picked this up from a snake charmer in Rajasthan awhile back and have always been curious what the proper name of the instrument was? This wasn't one of the little tourist ones he was trying to peddle -- I negotiated for his -- the one he was using! The metal pipe slides in and out:

IMG_6649.jpeg  IMG_6650.jpeg  IMG_6651.jpeg 



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david

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Reply with quote  #2 
https://chandrakantha.com/articles/indian_music/pungi.html
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Michael MacLean

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Great! Thank you
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Sanjeeb

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Reply with quote  #4 
I have been watching Snake Charmers in India using this since my childhood and have known it to called a 'been'.
Have even tried playing it.  Similar to Scottish bagpipes also. Back in those days they did not have metal pipes.
And they were longer. 
Best wishes
Sanjeeb Sircar
http://www.sanjeebsircar.com
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Michael MacLean

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Fun fact, thanks Sanjeeb! Yes, it's fun to play, albeit difficult. My 3 month old doesn't like it very much. Haha
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albob

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hello Michael.
My experience in India is they were called a pungi and are refereed to as that in. academic books I also in another province heard the called been but with the soft v/b sound in Indian speech. There are probably regional and geographically influences at play also. they probably have other names as  indigenous groups, and regional languages may be adapted. I saw the snake charmer flute all over India it pretty widespread areas.

Al
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DrKashyap

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DrKashyap

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DrKashyap

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Reply with quote  #9 
Similar instrument from dessert folk ( Kutch, Rajasthan ), but without a common air chamber is called JoDIyA pAwA ( lit: Paired flutes)
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Michael MacLean

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Very interesting! Thank you all.
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Sitar Fixer

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Reply with quote  #11 
I've heard the names of this as "Pungi" ( from the Bina catalog 1982 )  And "Tik-Tiri" as well. Used to play one when I was doing singing telegrams with a belly dancer. Great fun ! ! !
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