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Harry D Collier IV

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Reply with quote  #16 

While 85,000 is not cheap it is worth it for a quality instrument.  

Can you ship to Russia and what is the shipping price?

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Maqsood Attar

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Reply with quote  #17 
Dear Harry,

Yes, we can ship to Russia... the parcel will be of two cases, one is for both tumba/pumpkins and another is for dandy.

_DSC7049.jpg  In this price the dandy end will be simple and not dragon head...

For more discussion regarding price, design, shipping cost, please contact me on my e-mail : muskan_22121@yahoo.co.in



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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #18 
I am a bit amazed that anyone would suggest that $1,200 - $1,300 is too expensive for a hand made Rudra Veena by a good small shop maker. Why on earth should a good quality hand made Rudra Veena be cheaper than that?
If it plays well and sounds good, that seems a bargain. 

That is what you pay in the west for a decent midrange Fender Stratocaster, a solid block of wood with very little decoration, made mostly by machine.  These hand made ICM instruments are time intensive, highly decorated, art pieces.

Actually, it is also the general price being asked for those low quality Ebay Rudra Veenas, that are undoubtedly dubious in quality, and certainly inferior to one you might procure from a respectable small shop maker.

If you think that is expensive, don't start playing mandolin or Violin, as the price of a professional quality instrument would give you a heart attack. Personally, I am surprised they can create a good quality Veena at $1,200.

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Nick Proctor

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Reply with quote  #19 
I DO hope this last post wasn't aimed at me ?!?!?!!?
I didn't suggest 85 thou is too expensive generally. but it IS for a beginner who's only just starting out on it. I would NEVER discourage ANYONE from this gorgeous rare instrument !!!!

ANYWAY If you want to see stupid pricing of sitars etc then please go to Ebay & see some of the lesser quality stuff going for what I'd price MINE up at & that's without all the extras you'd get with mine such as fiber box, string coils, mizrabs etc.

Bas Sab tikh hai.
Mera gussa qatam hai !?!?
HA HA

Nick
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mahadev

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Reply with quote  #20 
A craftsman with this level of skill would have a decent income and a comfortable life in Europe or the US.
In India, he can just about survive. He wont starve but he wont get rich either.
We forget that so many things we use and wear and eat every day are produced by people who get paid peanuts. In China,in Africa, in Vietnam, in Bangladesh , you name it.
The rudra veena is not a beginners instrument. In India nobody starts learning music on a rudra veena.
At least that is how it used to be.
The great Ustad Asad Ali Khan Sahib was also a very accomplished sitar player. His father made him play the sitar for seven years before he allowed him to touch the veena.
This instrument has to be approached with great respect . There are a lot of stories in circulation about the negative effects of not treating this instrument properly or playing it out of tune. It is venerated as the instrument of the Gods. It possibly predates any other instrument still being played today. I am sure there are experts on this board who can tell us how far back the rudra veena really goes.
The sound is very intense and it goes right through your body. What an amazing concept.
The rudra veena is an instrument like no other.
Now I don't want to put anybody off. The more people who play this instrument the better. It must survive. Just make sure you have a good teacher. Start with a sitar and learn vocal, get a good working knowledge of ICM and only then move on to the veena.
It's a process.

Caution : you may quit your day job...

[smile]

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http://maxflury.com/
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Nick Proctor

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Reply with quote  #21 
What a briliant post !?!?!? And YOU should know eh, M?????
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Proctor
I DO hope this last post wasn't aimed at me ?!?!?!!?
I didn't suggest 85 thou is too expensive generally. but it IS for a beginner who's only just starting out on it. I would NEVER discourage ANYONE from this gorgeous rare instrument !!!!


LOL... Well, you were not the only one to suggest it was expensive, BUT, although not "aimed" at you, I was obviously responding to the sentiment in your post. "Aimed at" would suggest an attempt at wounding, which was not the intention. Just a statement of differing opinion.

I think even if it is for a student starting out, it is a reasonable price for the instrument in question. There are some instruments that do not really have a reasonable super cheap version that is worth bothering with. I would think a Rudra Veena that was significantly cheaper would most likely be poor quality, possibly very difficult to play, and would not have a particularly satisfying tone. All that would lead to the student getting discourage from the start. A student should have an instrument that is not as misery to play, and has at least a pleasing tone. 

I know there are many cheap sitars sitting in closets out in the world that will never be played again.
People buy them because they are a few hundred dollars, and thought it might be a good starter instrument, but find them in reality to be almost useless, causing them to never even start learning to play. 

My first sitar was a $300 Ebay special that I bought before I knew a single thing about sitars.
I thought it was neat when it first arrived, but was in for a shock at my first lesson when I realized it was actually a pile of shite. It was absolutely useless. No tone, hard to meend, and just awful to listen to. When I heard my teacher's Hiren Roy, and then heard him play my Ebay sitar, the reality was clear. 

I quickly bought a used Hiren Roy, and the difference was night and day. 
I never played the ebay sitar again, and gave it away to a nice hippy kid who thought it would be neat as a decoration in his room. Honestly I couldn't even sell it, as I just thought that would be a kind of fraud to charge someone for that sitar.

Anyhoo, I just think that if one wants to learn to play the Rudra Veena, one should probably shell out for a reasonably priced nice playable one, like the $1,200 one offered earlier in this thread, or the journey might end before it starts. The truth is that, as Max pointed out, they would probably be better off starting on sitar/surbahar and learning some vocal stuff first, and then ease into Veena at some point in the future. 
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Nick Proctor

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Reply with quote  #23 
Totally agree.
BTW I WAS joking a little with my replies so don't worry about that.

Good final point about being on sitar & surbahar FIRST & easing into the Veena later. Can't imagine a total beginner EVER going straight onto Rudra Veena.

AIH Thank Yew !!!
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cwroyds

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Proctor
Totally agree.
BTW I WAS joking a little with my replies so don't worry about that.

Good final point about being on sitar & surbahar FIRST & easing into the Veena later. Can't imagine a total beginner EVER going straight onto Rudra Veena.

AIH Thank Yew !!!


Ha!! I had no doubt you were joking.
I took it as cheeky wink wink outrage.
So no worries.
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westsea

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Reply with quote  #25 
This is a bit off topic, but this topic was discussed here.
It seems to be generally accepted that a person who may want to learn Rudra Veena, should begin their ICM studies with vocal, then sitar, then surbahar, then been.  I've even heard tabla as the start of the list, followed by the rest.
I've never understood that.  Vocal alone can take a lifetime to master.  Same with tabla, sitar and surbahar.  I don't see one as being more difficult or more complex than any other one.  A beginning student should be fine with any of  those studies, if the student has a good teacher.

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Nick Proctor

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Reply with quote  #26 
NOBODY says/said anything about mastering anything on the topic.
I had pakhawaj lessons a few years back in Varanasi & went several times a week when I was there. Was great for me as I'd been 'on tabla' for soooo many years before meaning I knew about tala etc. It was great as pakhawaj is a WONDERFUL instrument but getting rare !?!?!?

Even though my main is sitar I can quite easily accompany an artist on tabla even now. But then it IS 150 years later HA HA
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albob

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Reply with quote  #27 
"The rudra veena is an instrument like no other.
Now I don't want to put anybody off. The more people who play this instrument the better. It must survive. Just make sure you have a good teacher. Start with a sitar and learn vocal, get a good working knowledge of ICM and only then move on to the veena.
It's a process.

Caution : you may quit your day job..."

Brilliant post Max,
albob
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barend

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsea
This is a bit off topic, but this topic was discussed here.
It seems to be generally accepted that a person who may want to learn Rudra Veena, should begin their ICM studies with vocal, then sitar, then surbahar, then been.  I've even heard tabla as the start of the list, followed by the rest.
I've never understood that.  Vocal alone can take a lifetime to master.  Same with tabla, sitar and surbahar.  I don't see one as being more difficult or more complex than any other one.  A beginning student should be fine with any of  those studies, if the student has a good teacher.


I agree with you. I also don't understand why you have to play sitar and surbahar first in order to play veena. Although it doesn't hurt to have some experience with sitar or surbahar I don't see why it is necessary if you know for sure you want to play rudra veena from the start. If you know you want to learn it why waste time (so to speak) with other instruments and not start with it right away? It is like when someone wants to learn cello he has to start on cello and upright bass first before he is allowed to play the violin. I don't consider rudra veena to be more difficult than any other Indian string instrument. Maybe it is physically more demanding but so is surbahar.

So besides the mythical stuff can someone explain why this is?
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musicslug

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Reply with quote  #29 
Barend: I play surbahar and vina. vina's more difficult because the way the strings are set up: when you pull a meend on the main string, you're also displacing the jordi and (sometimes) even the pancham - the main string gets pulled towards the jordi + pancham, unlike on surbahar/sitar, where it gets pulled away from them. also - and this isn't as big an issue - the string gauges on vina tend to be a bit thicker. mostly it's the string order. did that make sense?
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Nick Proctor

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Reply with quote  #30 
Made perfect sense as the dand is basically a STICK so you would have to pull the main string AROUND the 'circle', if you will, for any length of meend. Also there's nowhere to really place the thumb as in sitar.

The best we can get with what there is, eh?
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