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Tristan von Neumann

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Reply with quote  #1 
As I would like to get a feeling for Tala hands on, I browsed German ebay and found a Tabla pair for 50 bucks on which no one wanted to place a bid.
Other auctions also had low numbers of bids.
I didn't want to bid on the other ones people already bid on, so in the end I was lucky and was the only one, getting it for the 50 bucks.
The downside was: no cushions or gigbag, and no hammer, also the paste on the dayan was partially crackled off.
The bayan has elaborate embossed floral ornaments (I can't say if it's chromed copper or just steel), no dents and perfectly clear paste, so I thought it couldn't be that bad and might be worth it.

Now I obviously have to restore the dayan's syahi patch.

Is it possible to dissolve the remaining paste with water, scrape it off, then apply it back again in an orderly manner, maybe stretching it with selfmade iron filings and crushed rice?
I'm willing to experiment and work on it.
What are the alternatives? (Other than sending it to a probably pricy craftsman)
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david

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Reply with quote  #2 
The most practical thing to do is to replace the entire head.  Unfortunately, the Dayan is not to forgiving compared to the bayan, so you may wish to seek the aid of someone more experienced.
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Tristan von Neumann

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks David, but I fear this is not within by budget.

I just read that for Pakhawaj a simple sealing putty made from ground rocks and mineral oil can be applied instead of the traditional dough. The putty does not tend to crackle soon and can be removed without leaving traces.
Could this putty be used for the dayan?
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Tristan von Neumann

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Reply with quote  #4 
Here's a picture of the syahi. Any thoughts?

Attached Images
jpeg s-l1600.jpg (369.45 KB, 4 views)

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taaliyan

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Reply with quote  #5 
As David mentioned, applying the paste for a Dayan is an intricate job. If the particles are sealed by a putty when applying the new syahi, sound will be blocked. If you cannot apply the paste accurately, the "thap" and "chat" will be in two different pitches. 

You will have nothing to lose by experimenting, so by all means you can and should do so. The only problem is that the technique cannot by taught by email or phone.
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drtom

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hey Tristan,

I found myself patting myself on the back for not suggesting you try patching that up with some bubble gum.

The idea crossed my mind, not because of my cruel nature but because I repair tablas on a regular basis and have seen repair efforts that continue to amaze me.  Here's one I received precisely today.

[DcxsmqXUQAA21dq] 

The bubble gum solution is no more likely to work than your idea, but it would waste less of your time.

I fully understand limited budgets, though, and have a suggestion.  You're obviously a hands on individual.  Try purchasing a replacement pudi and mounting it yourself.

Good luck, and hope you let us know how this all works out for you.

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Tristan von Neumann

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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks Dr. Tom, but getting a replacement pudi is already too expensive.

As I'm not the guy who is giving up easily, I'll try making paste and applying it myself.
Testing the paste on spare leather and then trying to recreate the patch.
The goal of the sound is clear, also I have time.
I even have measuring equipment to check if the frequency spectrum is as desired.

I recently carved bridges for the sitar I found, and they also worked quite well, even though they were of beechwood. When you know how something should work, it's only a matter of time.
If in the end the sound of the tabla is anything near usable to practice, it's ok for me.
And if it's superbad, I'll have to save some money for the pudi.

I'm puzzled though how this damage has been done in the first place... I guess someone was using sticks...
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drtom

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
I'm puzzled though how this damage has been done in the first place


That's probably deterioration rather than damage.  This has to do with the structure of the syahi.

You're obviously new to the tabla.  I'll leave the explanation to you as homework.

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Tristan von Neumann

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Dr. Tom, please spare your condescension.
Of course I am new, I just said so.
I already know how the syahi is made and applied, because I can read, and there's tons of footage of craftsmen applying it. The question is - can I do it myself?
So are iron dust, flour/overcooked rice and water enough to do it?
Does the presence of wheat protein prevent rusting of the iron, or is it the "secret ingredient"?
These questions I seem to have to answer myself if no one wants to share his wisdom...
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