INDIAN MUSIC FORUMS

Register Calendar Latest Topics Chat
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
jazzman1945

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi!
What is customary in the tradition of improvisation performance in relation to body movements and facial expressions?  Thanks!
0
Sanjeeb

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 410
Reply with quote  #2 

Allow me to rant a little at first.

 

For me any 'extra and unrequired body movement / physical expression gives negative vibes and takes away from the performance.

 

Also when the performer while performing is 'always looking' at the audience with an intent to suck their admiration is generally a negative sign. In my opinion he or she should be concentrating more on what they are playing.

 

To answer your question....

'What is customary in the tradition of improvisation performance in relation to body movements and facial expressions?  Thanks!'

To me simply general etiquette and grace.

 

Hope that answers something !

Regards

Sanjeeb Sircar

http://www.sanjeebsircar.com

0
holika

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #3 
I believe each performer has his/her expression anyway I would point out that ladies are less encouraged to use movements on stage as vocal+gestures recall the courtesans' style to many and is still a sort of taboo. I would also notice, anyway, that hands are extensions of our voice and hand movements can help vocal expression so It is helpful to use them and some performers do it well. I like how some performers can 'paint' music in the air.
0
Jaiapal

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #4 
My teacher learned from an old master from the early/mid 20th century in Kolkata. He instructed my teacher to practice in front of a mirror in order to reduce facial expressions and body movements.

Facial expressions and body movements beyond what you would make during a casual conversation are likely physical manifestations of mental and emotional stress. If you’re attentive then you’ll find that they usually occur when playing something technically difficult, or when playing is starting to overwhelm your emotional capacity. That being said, maintaining an externally placid demeanor has a pretty large practical value. This can actually address many things that may feel like they are holding a musician back.

At the risk of getting a little too spiritual: Think of this metaphor. The energy coursing through the mind and body while playing music can become pretty intense, especially when building up to big crescendos, executing tihais, etc. Its like electricity flowing through you. If electricity flows through some conduit which cannot contain its current, it will escape in some violent or unpredictable way. This is what’s happening in the face and the body when expressions occur during playing. By “patching up these holes” (so to speak) the player begins to keep the flow of energy and ideas more focused and less fragmented. As a result, the capacity of your inner conduit will grow and you will begin to stay quite calm while playing faster, more complex, more emotionally impactful music.
0
holika

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #5 
There is a difference between wanted and unwanted movements and if something is done willigly or not. Some vocal styles even have precise typical movements. I agree that excessive movements are not beneficial in Hidustani vocal music, but to me even being completely still might hinder the energy flow
0
Jaiapal

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #6 
Yes, I agree, when it comes to intentional expressions, it just comes down to social grace and tact. Be natural and be yourself and you will put the listeners at ease and they will experience your music more. Have fun or be serious.....I would feel strange if someone seemed like they were at a playground while playing or singing Alap in Darbari Kanhra or if they were staring deeply into space while playing or singing a drut Gaur Sarang.
0
jazzman1945

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks for answers! And yet: is it necessary to suppress "unwanted" movements by force?
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.